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bilateral breast cancer prognosis

A 71-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
38 years experience in General Surgery
Yes: Breast cancer can be stage 0 non-invasive. Stage1, stage 2, stage 3 and stage 4. Each of the stages has a variety if statistical possible outcomes and ... Read More
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A 35-year-old male asked:
Dr. Ann Traynor
42 years experience in Hematology and Oncology
Prognosis: That very much depends on the stage at diagnosis and the treatment; these days most women with triple negative breast cancer receive neoadjuvant chemo ... Read More
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7 thanks
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sean Canale
29 years experience in Breast Surgery
Depends: A lot of different factors are used to predict prognosis in breast cancer and stage is one. Grade (how similar or different from normal breast tissue ... Read More
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5 thanks
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience in Pathology
Multi-factorial: Prognosis of breast cancer depends on multiple factors. HER2/NEU marker determination is important because of availability of a specific antibody trea ... Read More
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1 thank
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
38 years experience in General Surgery
Depends: Lymph nodes are one aspect of evaluation for stage and treatment of breast cancer. It depends on size of breast cancer itself, number of lymph nodes i ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carlos Encarnacion
34 years experience in Medical Oncology
Yes: ...In theory, with aggressive multi modality therapy (surgery plus chemo plus radiation +/- hormones +/- herceptin). The risk of relapse is high but y ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Addagada Rao
55 years experience in General Surgery
In one word unknown : Ductal carcinoma in situ dcis is simply the sleeping cancer cells inside the breast ducts, like a garden hose loaded with cancer cells safe if they ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Devon Webster
21 years experience in Medical Oncology
It can be: Dcis, the earliest form of breast cancer, can be associated with brca mutations. 13% of women under 50 diagnosed with dcis had a brca mutation in ret ... Read More
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6 thanks
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jon Strasser
20 years experience in Radiation Oncology
Possible: Breast cancer can metastasize. The risk is really dependent on the stage. For a stage i, the risk is.
A 46-year-old female asked:
Dr. Myron Arlen
63 years experience in Surgical Oncology
Prognosis fair: Stage IIb breast cancer is usually palpable at 2-5 cm. and at time of procedure to remove lesion, sentinel nodes are + suggesting axillary dissection ... Read More
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A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Hernani Cualing
29 years experience in Pathology
No its medullary: a quote from Lancethttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9167459: "The occurrence of invasive lobular carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma was not si ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Cherullo
23 years experience in Urology
Depends: If the prostate cancer is still responsive to androgen deprivation therapy (adt), which is chemical elimination of testosterone, the patient might hav ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
38 years experience in General Surgery
Depends: There are many factors needed to know, not just the cell type . It depends on tumor size, lymph node status, and possible dna cell type evaluation. Ne ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. George T Tsai
26 years experience in General Surgery
Cancer spread: In later stages of breast cancer, the disease is no longer confined to the breast. When breast cancer is found in bone, brain, lung and/or liver - it ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
38 years experience in General Surgery
Very tiny: It is the finding of a tiny cluster of breast cancer cells that have traveled to the axillary lymph node. It has not been found to be a worse prognosi ... Read More
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1 thank
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bruce J. Stringer
46 years experience in Radiology
Could Be: You have a known breast ca? Any other mets? Typically, one would expect mets to bone before abdomen. If pathology on both sites is the same then proba ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barry Rosen
33 years experience in General Surgery
Distant Spread: Stage IV breast cancer means that the cancer has spread to another organ such as the lungs, liver, or bone. Stage III cancer describes a cancer that ... Read More
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A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. Herbert Hoover
50 years experience in General Practice
Prognosis is good!: I would need more information to be definitive but with a small primary tumor (stage 1) and only micrometastasis in one node, your prognosis should b ... Read More
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
Breast Cancer: Learn more about intraductal carcinoma of the breast at: http://www.Intraductalcarcinoma.Net/.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
36 years experience in Hematology and Oncology
This depends: The answer depends on many factors. How old is the persone, what other medical problems do they have, when did the breast cancer first occur, what oth ... Read More
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1 thank
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
Survival Rates: According to the american cancer society the 5 year relative survival rate for stage 1 is 100%, stage ii- 93%, stage iii is 72% and stage IV is 22%.
A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. Sakeer Hussain
Specializes in Hematology and Oncology
Surgery?: would need radiation if surgical treatment was lumpectomy. Patient is young and need further evaluation with detailed family history. Estrogen and HER ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Orr
43 years experience in Surgical Oncology
Spread: Usually means spead beyond the local regional areas - that is to lungs, liver, brain, bones, etc.

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