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ayurvedic treatment of pudendal nerve entrapment

A 57-year-old male asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Pudendal Nerve: Surgical decompression, Pudendal nerve block, or Pulsed Radiofrequency.

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A 35-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Uyeda
44 years experience General Surgery
Not likely: There are several anatomical planes between the two structures.
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Richard Romano
8 years experience Internal Medicine
Pudendal nerve : There are no medical literature findings to connect the two. Ankylosing spondylitis can affect the ligaments of the pelvis. Pudendal nerve entrapment ... Read More
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1 thank
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Tyson
38 years experience Pain Management
Probably not: Pudendal nerve entrapment is unlikely to be effectively treated using an inversion table although the nerve pain might feel better temporarily while i ... Read More
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Andrew Germanovich
12 years experience Pain Management
Probably not: The most common cause of nerve entrapment is scar tissue. Inversion table won't help. Seek help of a pain specialist or urologist.
A 52-year-old male asked:
Dr. David Bloome
24 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Yes : Pudendal nerve entrapment is an uncommon problem caused by compression of the pudendal nerve which is usually worsened with sitting. Symptoms can inc ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Romanth Waghmarae
38 years experience Pain Management
Pudendal: Firstly medications like gabapentin, pregabalin, duloxetine are certainly options, nerve blocks diagnostically, and lastly neuromodulation.
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Recommendations: Would get this addressed first, and start working with a physical therapist who has DOCUMENTED training in area of Pelvic Floor Therapy. Get involved ... Read More
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A 46-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Gabor
32 years experience Diagnostic Radiology
It depends: It depends on the area being scanned. If it is a Lumbosacral MRI, the perineum will not be evaluated well. Tarlov cysts canbe identified, however.
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A 56-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald Colantino
60 years experience Internal Medicine
Pudendal nerve: Pudendal nerve entrapment may cause pain on sitting, urinary and/or fecal incontinence. In males it may cause penile numbness or scrotum. A neurologis ... Read More
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1 thank

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