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autopsy lungs of a smoker

A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carla Enriquez
49 years experience in Pediatrics
Soot: That is how the entrapment of partially burned or charred tobacco soiling the lungs of a smoker looks. Look in an ashtray for a good visual analogy.
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A 75-year-old male asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience in General Surgery
Yes: Both are cancers in deep tissue and may cause no symptoms until coughing, bleeding, pain.
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience in Pathology
Full autopsy: Only a complete autopsy will answer the key questions. Was this really a gunshot wound? Can we recover the bullet? Did the person suffer greatly? Was ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Roth
42 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Smoking cessation: The lungs are quite capable of providing their own mechanisms of detox when they are not loaded down with smoke. Consider nicotine anonymous.
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dennis Clifford
42 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Possibly: Which part of the test was 82 %? An fev1 of 82% may indicate mild or early copd.
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A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience in Pathology
Very low: The risk at this stage is very low. If you have not quit smoking, do it now while you are ahead. Do not get into e-cigarettes or chewing tobacco. Stay ... Read More
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A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Kristin Sokol
11 years experience in Allergy and Immunology
Difficult todiagnose: A chest Xray alone cannot give detailed information about whether a patient has asthma vs. COPD. Many factors must be taken into account. A full set o ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stuart Flechner
45 years experience in Urology
Yes: Many smokers have developed chronic obstructive lung disease as the cause of their lung failure. It would be important that the smoking has stopped.
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A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Austina Cho
25 years experience in Psychiatry
It's decreased.: It is reduced compared to that of a non-smoker due to lung disease. According to the CDC, smoking can stunt lung development in teens and can increase ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Cooke
21 years experience in Thoracic Surgery
15-17%: About 15-17% of smokers develop lung cancer or emphysema. About 85% of patients with lung cancer have been exposed to significant amounts of cigarett ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
46 years experience in Radiation Oncology
Normal lung: Is pink, moist and bubbly. A smoked lung is black, rift with holes, non-pliant.
A member asked:
Dr. Al Hegab
Dr. Al Hegab answered
39 years experience in Allergy and Immunology
No: it needs prolonged exposure over years
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience in General Surgery
Not usually: Longer exposure to primary or secondary is more common but avoid if you can!, .
A 39-year-old male asked:
Dr. Luis Villaplana
34 years experience in Internal Medicine
Very good: The probability of developing emphysema in a 1 pack a day smoker is dependant upon longevity, not race. If you smoke for long enough, the chances are ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Clarence Grim
56 years experience in Endocrinology
Smell of cigarettes: Some with get bronchospasm and wheeling.
A 26-year-old male asked:
Dr. Lewis Hassell
38 years experience in Pathology
Risk: Lung cancer usually requires multiple "hits" to the genes in your cells before the cells become fully malignant. Statistically, this requires exposure ... Read More
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A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Carla Enriquez
49 years experience in Pediatrics
Very rare: Lung cancer is not a common problem in young people. But people with anxiety disorders tend to worry excessively about things that have a very unlikel ... Read More
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A 23-year-old male asked:
Dr. John Scuba
24 years experience in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Oral blood: Anytime there is recurrent blood in oral secretions, a thorough exam is in order. While many doctors immediately consider chest or respiratory causes, ... Read More
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A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. Sewa Legha
49 years experience in Medical Oncology
Yes many such causes: Shortness of breath can be caused by many reasons. Your doctor will need to examine you to find the cause. It can be from low hemoglobin, it can be he ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Brian Fishman
8 years experience in Emergency Medicine
Yes: Second-hand smoke is dangerous for anyone, regardless of whether they're recovering from an acute illness or not. However, if you are recovering from ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Liawaty Ho
22 years experience in Hematology and Oncology
YES: Yes absolutely. Not only lung cancer, that person also will be at high risk to develop other smoking/alcohol related cancer ( head and neck cancer, es ... Read More
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience in General Surgery
Unlikely: Most are longer exposure, but i'm sure there are some like you express.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Pot: Bad idea, especially for lung.
A 61-year-old male asked:
Dr. Le Wang
Dr. Le Wang answered
35 years experience in Internal Medicine
Follow-up: Is this new? Anyway, I recommend that your lung nodule be followed with series CT scans by your doctor. It is too small now for diagnostic work-up. Al ... Read More
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2 thanks

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