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aphasia dysphasia

A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nalinaksha Joshi
22 years experience in Neurology
As below: Dysphasia means trouble in swallowing, aphasia means trouble in language.
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ankush Bansal
16 years experience in Internal Medicine
Different: By definition, dysphasia is difficulty speaking or problems with the speech. Dys = bad, phas = speech. Aphasia means inability to speak (either exp ... Read More
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A member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Aphasia: Not necessarily, especially if it is isolated symptom without other neurologic signs. Get more reassurance from a neurologist.
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Wernike Aphasia: Speech is fluent but often degenerates into random hard to follow "streams of consciousness, which may be peppered with non-words or made up words. Th ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Glusker
46 years experience in Neurology
Aphasias: Aphasia is a problem with language (with speech sounds being normal). Wernicke and broca's areas are regions of the brain where damage results in aph ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Marlis Gonzalez fernandez
12 years experience in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Difficulty naming: Anomic aphasia is a language difficulty where the main deficit is naming. It occurs in people with brain problems most commonly stroke.
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A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Wernike Aphasia: Speech is fluent but often degenerates into random hard to follow "streams of consciousness, which may be peppered with non-words or made up words. Th ... Read More
A 71-year-old male asked:
Dr. Edgar Mendizabal
54 years experience in Internal Medicine
Parkinson's disease: Is someties difficult to treat. you might add bromocriptine
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience in Pathology
Communication: Disorders. Audiologists and speech pathologist are part of the communications disorder specialty. Speech pathologists specialize in speech and swall ... Read More
A 58-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience in Neurology
Search for cause: The term "cerebral atrophy" is generic and does not explain why your dad is impaired. You truly need to have a full neurological evaluation, as the sy ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Goodrich
38 years experience in Neurosurgery
Receptive aphasia: There are no real exercises but a consultation with a speech therapist might be helpful here - usually it is just time and seeing where the patient en ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Forshing Lui
42 years experience in Neurology
Aphasia yherapy: Speech therapy exercises may improve expressive aphasia. Try to talk more will help.
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience in Pediatrics
Several things can..: Problems in the ability of the brain to tell the speaking-muscles (in tongue, throat, voicebox, etc...) what to do; problems in the tongue, throat, or ... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Osman Mir
Dr. Osman Mir answered
20 years experience in Neurology
Yes it can affect. : Any therapy including speech and physical should be done on the orders of your treating physician. Best way is if you think your speech is affected a ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience in Neurology
SPEECH PROBLEM: Loss of ability to express or comprehend speech may be due to various brain problems, and could be secondary to a stroke, dementias, head injury or br ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Bassam Amawi
48 years experience in Psychiatry
As above: I hope s/he is being seen by a neurologist , if this the case discuss u question with him.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Forshing Lui
42 years experience in Neurology
Aphasia: Aphasia means impaired language function. It may affect the comprehension or expression or both.
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pavel Conovalciuc
22 years experience in Family Medicine
A type of treatment: Stroke usually impairs functions of the pharynx and laryinx (voice box) as well as soft palate and tongue in that it pertains to swallowing and speech ... Read More
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A 11-year-old female asked:
Dr. Marc Zimmermann
21 years experience in Psychiatry
Many possibilities: There are a number of different conditions that might cause these symptoms. If your child's school has an assessment team ask them to help. If not c ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bryan Levey
26 years experience in Pediatrics
Delayed development: There are many kinds and many underlying causes, but the bottom line is this: a child can have difficulty learning to talk, a child can have difficul ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Fisher
31 years experience in Dermatology
Neuropathy: It affects men much more than women. Symptoms also include muscle wasting, cramping, and involuntary contractions or twitching of the leg muscles. The ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Marlis Gonzalez fernandez
12 years experience in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Language therapy: In the most basic terms aphasia rehabilitation seeks to restore the ability of a person to put words together for speaking (generate language) and/or ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
32 years experience in Neurology
It's HUH? vs. DARN!: In sensory aphasia the patient has a comprehension problem. What is said to them is not correctly understood or registered resulting in perfectly form ... Read More

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