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Amlodipine

A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Szawaluk
30 years experience Cardiology
Yes: Yes.
8
8 thanks

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A 60-year-old male asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Amlodipine: It's a vasodilator, so is viagra (sildenafil). You wouldn't necessarily expect a problem with e.
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1 thank
A 43-year-old male asked:
Dr. Rick Koch
Dr. Rick Koch answered
21 years experience Cardiology
Max dose is: 10mg/day regardless of timing in general.
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2 thanks
A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. Philip Miller
46 years experience Family Medicine
Overdose: Normal dose os 5-20 mg. Go directly to the ER and get your heart and BP checked.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Combo: Both drugs are relatives. And work similarly. They are not exactly the same but do the same things.
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1 thank
A female asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Benicar (olmesartan): benicar is olmesartan and is an angiotensin receptor blocker. Amlodipine is a calcium channel blocker. They are not similar
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Val Koganski
34 years experience Internal Medicine
BP medication: BP medication, trade name: norvasc (amlodipine).
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7 thanks
A 67-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Yes: This is a very commonly used combination.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Addagada Rao
55 years experience General Surgery
Implicated: One of the most commonly, used Norvasc (amlodipine) ( Amlodipine Besylate ) for hypertension and angina, will develop in few patients edema of leg ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Norvasc (amlodipine): Norvasc (amlodipine) is a calcium channel blocker
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
HTN: All of those meds are used to treat high blood pressure.
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Dansie
15 years experience Family Medicine
Blood pressure med: Treats high blood pressure or chest pain (angina). A lower blood pressure will reduce the risk of stroke and heart attack. This medicine is a calcium ... Read More
A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Xanax (alprazolam): Inquiry not clear. Doses of medications not provided. Please resubmit. Thanks.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Mathew
57 years experience Cardiology
High BP: For hypertension!
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6 thanks
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Amlodipine: Amlodipine is the short name for amlodipine besylate.
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2 thanks
A 75-year-old male asked:
Dr. John Garner
15 years experience Cardiology
Yes, and...: Make sure you've had an echocardiogram checking for leakage of the aortic valve, which is not terribly likely but would explain the wide discrepancy b ... Read More
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1 thank
A 61-year-old member asked:
Dr. Howard Rubin
46 years experience Cardiology
Medications: Amlodipine.
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4 thanks
A 35-year-old male asked:
Dr. Nathan Almeida
22 years experience Cardiology
Relatively safe: Relatively safe medication, can cause mild ankle swelling ( benign). Discuss with your doc about using a single antihypertensive instead of small dose ... Read More
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1 thank
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Victor Bonuel
37 years experience Internal Medicine
Yes u can.: They belong to different classes of BP meds- diuretic, calcium channel blocker and beta blocker. Ask ur dr if u have heart, thyroid, kidney or adrenal ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Benicar (olmesartan): olmesartan is an angiotensin 2 receptor blocker. For information read this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olmesartan
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Val Koganski
34 years experience Internal Medicine
Hypertension: Hypertension, raynauds syndrome.
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33 thanks
A 52-year-old female asked:
Dr. Tarek Naguib
39 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Unsure. But: You can always try and see which one works best for you, with the support of you doc. There are many issues that vary the results among different calc ... Read More
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1 thank
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Payam Mehranpour
22 years experience Cardiology
No: Calcium channel blocker.
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1 thank
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Beta blockers: Zestril (lisinopril) and Norvasc are not beta blockers.
A 55-year-old male asked:
Dr. Ankush Bansal
16 years experience Internal Medicine
Yes: Generic of any drug will work just as well as the brand name. If there is a generic, there is no need to waste money on a brand name.
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Munshower
29 years experience Family Medicine
See answer: I have several patients who have been on these meds at one time or another without any issues. If your dr. Has an emr, they will often be able to ass ... Read More
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1 thank
A member asked:
Dr. Daniel Zanger
32 years experience Cardiology
Amlodipine: If you need to stop amlodipine due to side affect contact your physician to see what can be used in its place.
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2 thanks
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Szawaluk
30 years experience Cardiology
Lotrel (amlodipine and benazepril) contains : 2 drugs: amlodipine and benazepril. A generic form of this combp pill is not available, however, there are generic forms of each individual drug.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ankush Bansal
16 years experience Internal Medicine
Yes: Yes, you can take both if prescribed by your doctor for hypertension. You do need regular blood tests to monitor your kidney function when on an anti ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ted King
Dr. Ted King answered
39 years experience Phlebology
Many possible: According to webmd, the most common side effects of Norvasc (amlodipine) include: fluid retention in the legs, feet, arms or hands/visible water rete ... Read More
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8 thanks
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Payam Mehranpour
22 years experience Cardiology
Under supervision: Amlodipine is a medication used for treatment of high blood pressure. Discontinuation of this medication is not associated with significant rebound ef ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ted King
Dr. Ted King answered
39 years experience Phlebology
Not that I can find: Norvasc if the most common brand name that is associated with amlodipine besylate.
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1 thank
A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Not dangerous: The combination will potently lower BP - as long as your BP isn't too low, it's a good combination for lowering BP because the meds work by compleme ... Read More
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1 thank
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
valsartan: Diovan/hcl is valsartan/hcl and losartan/hcl is a different drug combination but closely related as both are angiotensin receptor blockers.
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1 thank
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Payam Mehranpour
22 years experience Cardiology
No: Norvasc or amlodipine is a calcium channel blocker.
A 46-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience Internal Medicine
See doc in few weeks: Hypertension is a marathon not a sprint. You are barely off the start line. BP should be given some time to stabilize and you should collect enough ... Read More
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1 thank
A 47-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jack Rubin
47 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Kidney side effects: V has a renal protective effect on patients who have proteinuria (p) as it reduces it. A increases blood flow (ibf) to the kidney and can cause, becau ... Read More
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6 thanks
A 57-year-old female asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Amlodipine: Amlodipine will be gone from your body in 5 to days if you don't take any more, nothing you have to do to clear it.
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1 thank
A 58-year-old female asked:
Dr. Steven Ajluni
34 years experience Cardiology
Usually 2 weeks: The side effects (most commonly swelling, rashes, GI complaints) should typically go away within a few weeks. If they don't you should definitely c ... Read More
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1 thank
A 62-year-old male asked:
Dr. Milton Alvis, jr
40 years experience Preventive Medicine
LookOnline & Empower: Search engines, esp google, can rapidly find these answers for you (& me), e.g. Search "amlodipine t½" & go to nih, fda or edu websites. Keep in mind ... Read More
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1 thank
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gerald Neuberg
37 years experience Cardiology
Not much: But why not tell us which herbs you want to take?
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Are you in Columbus: There are no serious interactions. But i'm puzzled, healthtap says you're in ohio but strepsils and benelyn are generally available overseas, especial ... Read More
A 60-year-old male asked:
Dr. John Szawaluk
30 years experience Cardiology
Depends: They are all effective. It really depends on how much lipid lowering you need. Rosuvastatin is the most potent. Discuss with your doctor.
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8 thanks
A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Irv Loh
Dr. Irv Loh answered
48 years experience Cardiology
Yes, but...: The metoprolol dose you describe is too low, but beta-blockers are not great hypertension drugs to start with anyway. There may be another reason you ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Full effect?: It can take several weeks to reach its full effect.
A 62-year-old male asked:
Dr. Wissam Hoyek
Specializes in Cardiology
No interaction: There is no interaction between amlodipine and calcium (food) ingestion. Most important is to take your medicine daily and on time.
5
5 thanks

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
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