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A member asked:

what does chicken pox look like?

8 doctor answers12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Scott Katz
Pediatrics 26 years experience
Bumps, blisters: Chicken pox typically starts as small red bumps which then turn into small, fluid filled blisters (vesicles) and then crust over. Typically new crops of bumps show up as the older ones are crusting. Children are contagious until all the spots have crusted.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Very small blisters: Chicken pox starts as small reddish spots, which form a very small fluid-filled blister in the middle of each spot. The small blister breaks easily when rubbed, releasing a tiny drop of clear yellowish fluid. Each spot then forms a small scab.
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics 46 years experience
Dew drop on rose ptl: The lesion has been poeticly described as a dew drop on a soft rose petal. It is one of the only viral rashes that goes thru several distinct stages in one day:tiny bump, thin walled clear blister(>bb size), cloudy blister, weeping or scabbed lesion. Often coming up around ears & neck it can spred to the body in hrs. It comes up in crops of new lesions over 5+ days. Average ~200/person total.
Dr. Nela Cordero
Pediatrics 54 years experience
VARICELLA: It starts with fever followed by crops of itchy macules, papules, then tear drop vesicles on a red base then crusting to dark scars mostly on face and trunk. It last for about 2 weeks.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Chickenpox: A rash from chickenpox often occurs first on trunk (chest/back) ; then moves to face ; then extremities. The rash becomes blisters that itch. Blisters usually have all transformed into scabs in about a week. There are usually around 100 to 300 lesions (more on adults than small children). The rash could spread to mouth, eyelids ; genitalia.
Dr. Scott Diede
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Different phases...: The chickenpox rash usually goes through three phases: raised pink or red bumps (papules), which break out over several days; fluid-filled blisters (vesicles), forming from the raised bumps over about one day before breaking and leaking; and crusts and scabs, which cover the broken blisters and take several more days to heal.
Dr. Tanya Russo
Pediatrics 25 years experience
Dew drop: The classic description of a chickenpox blister is 'a dewdrop on a rose petal'. However, the appearance of a typical varicella lesion is no longer 'typical' due to increased vaccination rates and decreased incidence of natural, florid disease. The rash is now variable and sometimes difficult to identify, but typically looks like a small bump or scab on a pink or red base with mild itching.
Dr. Tanya Russo
Pediatrics 25 years experience
Dew drop: The classic description of a chickenpox blister is 'a dewdrop on a rose petal'. However, the appearance of a typical varicella lesion is no longer 'typical' due to increased vaccination rates and decreased incidence of natural, florid disease. The rash is now variable and sometimes difficult to identify, but typically looks like a small bump or scab on a pink or red base with mild itching.

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A member asked:

What are the complications associated with chicken pox?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Arthur Torre
Pediatric Allergy and Asthma 51 years experience
Varied: Although chicken pox is generally considered more of a nuisance illness by many complications can be quite severe. Complications of chicken pox include bacterial infection of the skin lesions, pneumonia, encephalitis (brain involvement), glomerulonephritis (kidney involvement), arthritis, hepatitis (liver involvement), and reye syndrome.
A member asked:

How should I treat chicken pox?

9 doctor answers12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Coogan
Pediatrics 48 years experience
Prevention: Provide the varicella vaccine for your child! if chicken pox should occur, treat fever or discomfort with Acetaminophen and prevent secondary skin infection by bathing gently but thoroughly with mild soap once or twice daily. For itching, you can apply plain calamine lotion (over the counter). If itching is severe or painful, or if the chicken pox lesions appear to be infected, call your doctor.
A member asked:

Who gets vaccinated for chicken pox?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Thad Woodard
Specializes in Pediatrics
Children over 1 year: Children over 1 year with out contraindications who have never had chickenpox.
India
A 23-year-old member asked:

What does chicken pox look like in the very beginning?

3 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Tsu-Yi Chuang
Dermatology 50 years experience
Small bumps: Many wide-spreading small bumps on body. The description of the lesions is "vesiculopapular eruptions". At the center of the lesion there is one tiny semi-tranparent blister(called vesicle) seated on a pink-to red raised small papule.
A 37-year-old member asked:

What does the chicken pox look like . Picture please?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Parkanswered
Pediatrics 50 years experience
See below: Chickepox rash always start on the trunk first then spread to arms and legs. 3-4 different shapes of rash present at same time, e.g., red spot, blister, red raised bump, and crust.

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