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Philadelphia, PA
A 22-year-old male asked:

orange bumps in back of throat? what can cause this? comes and goes

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Carla Enriquez
Pediatrics 50 years experience
Normal anatomy: Most likely explanation for what you see is normal anatomy. Those are probably bits of lymphoid tissue in the pharynx. They change in size depending on their immune activity.

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Similar questions

A 21-year-old female asked:

Orange spots on the back of my throat? What could this be?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Babak Larian
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 25 years experience
Pharyngitis signs: It could inflamed tissue or nodes or infection. It needs to be examined to asses what it is exactly.
A 17-year-old male asked:

Hello recently I have discovered little orange spots at the back of my throat Im not sure if this is normal and I cant find to much about it?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Orthodontics 53 years experience
Orange spots: Two week rule. Most oral cavity and throat lesions are temporary, and gone in 2 weeks. Know also that most of what you "discover" is normal and has probably been there forever. If still present 14 days from discovery, ask your GP or a specialist ENT to have a look. As long as you don't smoke (anything) or abuse alcohol, at your age the chances of anything dire are limited.

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Last updated Mar 14, 2019

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