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A 43-year-old male asked about a 73-year-old male:

is a moderate to severe blockage in left carotid artery dangerous?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
Cardiology 51 years experience
Carotid: Having a significant carotid lesion increases the chance of having an episode related to it. Generally we treat with anti atherosclerotic meds and aspirin. Sometimes we do prophylactic carotid endarterectomy if the clinical situation supports that step.
Dr. George Clark
Vascular Surgery 36 years experience
Carotid blockage: If asymptomatic with use of proper medical therapy a moderate carotid blockage is fairly low risk. Many vascular surgeons would favor no intervention in this situation. If symptomatic, would recommend repair of this. Options include stenting or open surgery, carotid endarterectomy. Best data suggests that stenting over age 65 -70 has higher risk of stroke than endarterectomy.
Dr. Mark Kahn
Dr. Mark Kahn answered
Vascular Surgery 47 years experience
Depends on how bad: Moderate narrowing less than 75-80% not very dangerous, low risk of stroke. More than this % of narrowing has risk stroke of 1-3% per year, if no symptoms.

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Similar questions

A 21-year-old member asked:

What are the carotid arteries?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Albert Pizzo
Family Medicine 60 years experience
Carotic Arteries: The human carotid arteries supply the head and the neck with oxygenated blood. The left common carotid artery originates from the aorta and the right common carotid originates from the brachiocephalic artery which originates from the aorta. The carotic artery divides in the neck to form the internal and external carotic arteries.
Algeria
A 18-year-old male asked:

What are the symptoms of dilation of carotid arteries?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Kenneth Smith
Internal Medicine 32 years experience
Carotid arteries: Dilated arteries none good flow. Stenosis restricted flow stroke like event.
A 36-year-old member asked:

What does narrowing of the carotid artery mean?

3 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Peter H'doubler
Vascular Surgery 40 years experience
See below: Carotid artery narrowing means that the carotid arteries have blockage, usually in the form of atherosclerosis. In the absence of neurological symptoms, most cases can be handled with medicine and close periodic follow up by a vascular surgeon. However, if the blockage is more than 80%, surgery will reduce the risk of stroke. In special instances, carotid angioplasty and stent may be an option.
A 40-year-old member asked:

Can your carotid artery spasm?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Philip Gardner
Vascular Surgery 45 years experience
Yes. : Any artery that is not "hardened" with plaque or calcium can go into spasm. However, connecting spasm with clinical symptoms is a more difficult. If you are concerned you should consult a vascular surgeon or neurologist.
A 48-year-old member asked:

Treatment for bilateral carotid artery calcifications?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Timothy Wu
Vascular Surgery 18 years experience
None: Calcification of any artery, by itself, does not warrant any type of intervention or follow up. If that calcification is associated with a stenosis ("narrowing") of the artery, then that may require follow up and/or an operation. The carotid arteries are very often calcified and if associated with a high grade stenosis, may portend a higher risk of stroke. Discuss with a vascular surgeon.

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Last updated Jul 7, 2018

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