A 49-year-old female asked:
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what is aytipical facial pain and the symptoms please?

3 doctor answers
Dr. Gary Sandler
53 years experience Dentistry
Not typical : Atypical facial pain is an unrecognized and unhelpful diagnosis but one which describes chronic pains that do not fit the present classification system. http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/neurology_neurosurgery/specialty_areas/headache/conditions/atypical_facial_pain.html or http://en.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/atypical_facial_pain.
Answered on May 4, 2015
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Dr. John Van der Werff
38 years experience Dentistry
Neuro disorder: It is a neurological disorder. There are no sores in the mouth. It is typically continuous pain that can feel like a tooth ache with no signs of a tooth problem.. It can also seem like a muscle pain. It is best diagnosed and treated with the help of an orofacial pain specialist who can rule-out other things that can feel like atypical facial pain.
Answered on Mar 21, 2015
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Dr. John Van der Werff
38 years experience Dentistry
Provided original answer
Thanks Dr. Sandler... I see about a half dozen patients with this problem each year. The 1st one I saw had had multiple root canals done by a well meaning dentist with no change in symptoms... As soon as i diagnosed the problem and started treatment the pain went away..
May 2, 2013
Dr. Gary Sandler
53 years experience Dentistry
Thanks Dr. Van der Werff for that additional and helpful information.
May 2, 2013
Dr. Louis Gallia
44 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Definition: Atypical Facial Pain (AFP, also termed atypical facial neuralgia,[1] chronic idiopathic facial pain,[2] or psychogenic facial pain),[3] is a type of chronic facial pain which does not fulfill any other diagnosis. Best explanation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atypical_facial_pain. See TMJ-orofacial pain doc for management.
Answered on May 4, 2015

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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Missid Ghanem
24 years experience Clinical Psychology
Possibly...: If one has dementia, that could explain such symptoms; otherwise, emotional, neuropsychological and/or organic factors would need to be explored.
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