U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 31-year-old male asked:

i just started snoring and experiencing shortness of breath when i play soccer especially when i run fast. i'm wondering what can be wrong with me.

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Munshower
Family Medicine 30 years experience
OSA: Snoring, shortness of breath (sob), lethargy can be signs of obstructive sleep apnea. Sob with exercise could be exercise induced asthma (eia). Several factors, including your weight can play a role in both diseases as well. See a dr. As both conditions are easily DX and treated. Best wishes.
Dr. Stephen Gordon
Dentistry 43 years experience
Consider this: A sleep study, either at home so in a sleep "lab" to determine if you have sleep apnea and the severity. If mild a dentist can often make an easy to wear night time guard that can improve your sleep thereby helping reduce or eliminate these symptoms. If more severe, you would need to wear the CPAP as pictured here.
Dr. Michael Summers
Sleep Medicine 23 years experience
Two independent: Two independent issues. The snoring could be heralding possible sleep apnea. The dyspnea when you run fast could be exercise induced asthma, deconditioning, etc. See a pulmonary doc that also specializes in sleep medicine and you could likely address both issues in a single visit. Good luck!

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership

Similar questions

A 26-year-old member asked:

Is shortness of breath common in pregnancy?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Megan Bird
Obstetrics and Gynecology 19 years experience
Yes: A gradual shortness of breath is common in pregnancy. It is usually due to the growing uterus pressing up on the lungs combined with the hormone changes in pregnancy. Even though you are feeling short of breath after doing small things, you are still getting enough oxygen. However, if you have sudden shortness of breath or medical problems, you should see your doctor right away.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Why am I short of breath if my oxygen saturation is good?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dean Giannone
Internal Medicine 25 years experience
Circumstance: The oxygen saturation, which might be acceptable when sitting in the doctor's office, goes down with activity, so would be lower when climbing stairs or carrying things. So you might get short of breath even though in the doctor's office the oxygen saturation is fine. Have the doctor let you walk around the office before checking the saturation to get a level more reflective of such with activity.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Do I need to change the way I run or my running shoes?

3 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Frank Holmes
Sports Medicine 23 years experience
It depends...: Your question does not mention your problem, but the general rule for updating running shoes is every 300-500 miles, every 9-12 months or sooner if there is significant wear of the tread on the sole. Changing running style can include a shorter/longer stride, cadence (steps/minute), how you footstrike, etc. Consult with a sports medicine physician to help you answer these questions!
A 35-year-old member asked:

Does your body get used to the fitness if you run every night?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Jennifer Haley
Dermatology 23 years experience
Yes!: You will accommodate and will not have to work as hard so you will not get as good of a workout. I am a big advocate of hiit (high intensity interval training) and recommend you add hill work or some sprints to your workout to challenge yourself - 30 sec sprint with 90 sec jog works well x 8. This workout also enhances natural secretion of growth hormone and increases your resting metabolism.
A 36-year-old member asked:

How can I find my maximum heart rate when running?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Michael Fenster
Cardiology 31 years experience
Take your pulse: At some point during peak exercise stop and take your pulse. Count the heartbeats over 10 seconds (and multiply by 6) or 15 seconds (and multiply by 4). This will give you beats per minute, which are the units to measure heart rate.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership
Last updated Jun 10, 2014

People also asked

Connect with a U.S. board-certified doctor by text or video anytime, anywhere.
$30 per visit with
membership

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.