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A 19-year-old female asked:

ways to treat sunburn?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Sunburn: Tylenol (acetaminophen) or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications. Cool compresses & aloe vera applied directly from the plant to the affected area.
Dr. Michael Miller
Wound care 36 years experience
Simple Care: Sunburn is response of the tissues to injury from solar radiation. It is simply inflammation which means increase blood flow to the area to promote healing. Do not use ice as this can injure already injured skin. Cool water soaks can help as can taking anti-inflammation medicines like Motrin or advil (ibuprofen). Avoid any further damage as this can cause scarring . Good skin cream applied daily/gently helps.

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A 27-year-old member asked:

Is there a good remedy to soothe a sunburn?

4 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Lockwood
Family Medicine 40 years experience
Topical Sprays: The topical anaesthetic sprays for sunburn are helpful as are medications such as Ibuprofen and acetomenophen. We all should use sunblock for ultraviolet ray exposure. Prevention is the best cure, especially persons with fair skin. While we need some sun exposure for vitamin d, skin cancers are on the rise and may be prevented by avoiding excessive exposure to the sun and ultraviolet rays.
A 27-year-old member asked:

How long does it typically take for a sunburn to go away?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. M. Christine Lee
Dermatology 28 years experience
1 to 2 weeks: Mild sunburns may resolve after 3 days. A 1st degree sunburn may take a week to go away. A 2nd degree sunburn (blistering) may take 2 weeks.
A 31-year-old member asked:

How do I get the redness out of a sunburn?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. M. Christine Lee
Dermatology 28 years experience
Cold compresses: Apply cold compresses with cold water or cold milk. Take Aspirin or ibuprofen. Benadryl (diphenhydramine) or other antihistamines can help with the itching. Do not pop the blisters. If the blisters do pop, you may need to see a doctor for an oral antibiotic in order to prevent spread of infection. Wear loose comfortable clothing made of 100% soft cotton--avoid synthetic or irritating materials.
A 44-year-old member asked:

Under what circumstances should a person with a sunburn go to a hospital emergency room? Is that overdoing it?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Christopher Moeller
Dermatology 38 years experience
Sunburn: You should seek help if the sunburn is causing severe pain, blistering or general feeling of malaise.
A 44-year-old member asked:

Can there be such thing as an invisible sunburn?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Theda Kontis
Facial Plastic Surgery 34 years experience
Sunburn: I have never hears of an invisible sunburn. Burned skin is usually visible.

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Last updated Apr 21, 2020

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