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A 31-year-old member asked:

i need to know what's an effective treatment for severe insomnia?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Polysomnogram: Likley need a sleep study if symptoms are severe. 1. Maintain a regular bedtime and awakening time schedule including weekends. Get up about the same time every day, regardless of what time you fell asleep. 2. Establish a regular, relaxing bedtime routine. Relaxing rituals prior to bedtime many include a warm bath or shower, aroma therapy, reading, or listening to soothing music. >>>.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Provided original answer
3. Sleep in a room that is dark, quiet, comfortable, and cool; Sleep on comfortable mattress and pillows. 4. Use your bedroom only for sleep and sex. Have work materials, computers, and TVs in another room. 5. Finish eating at least 2-3 hours prior to your regular bedtime. 6. Avoid caffeine within 6 hours; alcohol & smoking within 2 hours of bedtime. 7. Exercise regularly; finish a few hours before bedtime. 8. Avoid naps. 9. Go to bed only when sleepy. Lay in bed only for sleeping, not for work or watching TV. 10. Designate another time to write down problems & possible solutions in the late afternoon or early evening, not close to bedtime. 11. After 10-15 minutes of not being able to get to sleep, go to another room to read or watch TV until sleepy. Consider chamomile tea before bed. Warm milk. Lavender oil in bath or lavender scent on pillow. Melatonin is very helpful.
Apr 18, 2013

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A member asked:

Can babies get insomnia?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lawrence Rosen
Pediatrics 28 years experience
Yes, but...: Insomnia is hard to define - usually relates to difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. I would want to know how old the baby is - until 3-4 months, many babies have erratic sleep patterns. After that, most babies settle into more predictable sleep patterns. If your baby can't self-soothe and settle to sleep at least 10 hours at night by 4-6 months, that could be called "insomnia".
A 34-year-old member asked:

Does zopiclone work for insomnia?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ranji Varghese
Sleep Medicine 17 years experience
Depends: Insomnia, a disturbance in getting to, staying asleep, or non-refreshing sleep is a complicated disorder that may be secondary to poor sleep hygiene, medications, underlying medical or psychiatric disorder. It can also be its own entity. Medications can help for some with insomnia but are usually recommended for short term problems. If the insomnia does not resolve, make sure you see a specialist.
A 34-year-old member asked:

How long does accupuncture take to help with insomnia?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. R Sangal
Dr. R Sangalanswered
Sleep Medicine 43 years experience
Acupuncture - never: There really is no good evidence that acupuncture helps insomnia. If you sleep poorly often, and this is a persistent problem, then it is important to find the cause of insomnia and to treat the cause. Treatments can include cognitive-behavioral treatment that help you improve your sleep habits and get away from thoughts and associations that worsen sleep, or different kinds of medicines.
CA
A 33-year-old member asked:

Is it normal to develop insomnia after childbirth?

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ranji Varghese
Sleep Medicine 17 years experience
Yes: Having children and caring for a newborn can be a challenge for any parent. For women, a change in hormones, the anxiety of caring for a child day and night, and the frequent disturbances of sleep at night are a perfect recipe for insomnia. Fortunately, most people adjust as the baby's schedule adjusts. However, some women develop restless legs syndrome during pregnancy which can affect sleep.
A 42-year-old member asked:

How can I deal with chronic insomnia?

1 doctor answer5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Sleep hygiene: 1. Keep a regular bedtime & wakening time (to include weekends). Get up the same time each day, regardless of what time you fell asleep. 2. Make a regular, relaxing bedtime routine. Relaxing rituals prior to bedtime may include a warm bath or shower, aroma therapy, reading, or listening to gentle music. 3. Sleep in a dark, quiet, cool room on comfortable mattress & pillows.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Provided original answer
4. Use the bedroom only for sleep & sex. Have work materials, computers, & TVs in another room. 5. Finish eating at least 2-3 hs prior to your regular bedtime. 6. No caffeine within 6 hours; alcohol & smoking within 2 hrs of bedtime. Alcoholism is a major cause for insomnia. 7. Exercise regularly; finish a few hours before bedtime. 8. No naps. 9. Go to bed only when sleepy. Lay in bed only for sleeping, not for work or watching TV. 10. Designate another time to write down problems & possible solutions in the late afternoon or early evening, not close to bedtime. 11. After 10-15 minutes of not being able to get to sleep, go to another room to read or watch TV until sleepy. Consider chamomile tea before bed. Warm milk. Lavender oil in bath or lavender scent on pillow. Melatonin is very helpful. Acupuncture often works well for insomnia.
Jun 28, 2013

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