U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
Santa Clara, CA
A 29-year-old female asked about a female:

My 6-month-old girl caught flu/cold since friday. she has running nose and cough. she has mucus in her nose and it's understandable. the part worries me is that i can hear mucus when she breathes. shall i be concerned about it?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Clarene Cress
Specializes in Pediatrics
Depends: Infants have narrow nasal passages compared to adults, and breathing often sounds noisy when there is a cold. As long as your baby is able to take bottles or nurse ok, is normally interactive, and chest movement seems normal with breathing, she should be fine. She may be more comfortable in a seated or somewhat upright position.
Dr. David Houghton
Specializes in Internal Medicine & Pediatrics
Probably not: Coarse breath sounds when breathing is unlabored is generally not a concern. The sounds from upper airway get transmitted to chest and make many parents fear pneumonia. At that age, significant lung disease usually causes marked feeding trouble. If feeding reasonably well and breathing unlabored, then the noise is not likely dangerous.
Dr. Ashwin Patel
43 years experience
Needs to see M.D.: It appears that the baby has a viral infection. However, the gurgling sound during breathing is of concern. It can be from Bronchitis, Pneumonia, or Broncho spasm from allergy/ asthma. Please have her pediatrician check out as soon as you can and have it properly treated.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership
Last updated Mar 29, 2018

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.