U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
Philippines
A 36-year-old male asked:

Elevated ast=48 alt=83 with diffused fatty liver and slightly small liver size. what does it mean and how can it be treated?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Charles Cattano
Gastroenterology 39 years experience
Reverse risk factors: Fatty liver is incredibly common, predominantly due to: high alcohol intake, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity. The more of these risks you have, the greater the chance of fatty liver. Addressing these risks is an important step to correcting fatty liver. Distinguish hepatosteatosis (fatty liver) from steatohepatitis (fatty liver with abnormal liver tests that risks cirrhosis & liver cancer).

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership

Similar questions

Philippines
A 36-year-old male asked:

Elevated AST=43 and ALT=83 levels with diffused fatty liver and slightly smaller liver size. Is it an early sign of cirrhosis & how can it be treated?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 44 years experience
Manage it: This is worrisome and while this doesn't qualify as any kind of cirrhosis, you could end up with it. I trust hepatitis c, Wilson's, and a few others have been ruled out. Stay trim and fit and ask about meds.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership
Last updated May 19, 2015

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.