A 55-year-old female asked:
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ionized calcium 4.65, pth 133, calcium 10.3, vitamin d 7, phosphorus 4.9, recurrent kidney stones. thyroid lobe, two parathyroids removed in 2004.

1 doctor answer
Dr. Alan Feldman
40 years experience Endocrinology
Uncertain: These test results don't add up to a straight forward answer. However, I would be concerned about the possibility of recurrent primary hyperparathyroidism. You should take Vit D to eliminate Vit D deficiency as a cause for high PTH levels. Once this is done, if you still have high PTH with high calcium levels, you have recurrent primary HPTH and will need surgery again.
Answered on Jun 3, 2018
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