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A 68-year-old male asked:

What is migraine?

16 doctor answers29 doctors weighed in
Dr. Linda Gromko
Family Medicine 48 years experience
More than a headache: Migraines typically are throbbing headaches that tend to be on one side of the head. They may be accompanied by nausea and vomiting, sensitivity to light and sound. Sometimes, migraines are signaled by an "aura, " which may be a visual symptom such as flashing lights or wavy lines followed by a headache. Numbness, weakness, or difficulty talking may signal more severe problems.
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Migraines: A migraine is a vasospasm of a blood vessel in the brain. There are many symptoms. The common migraine's hallmark is a severe headache. The headache may be accompanied by nausea and vomiting, sensitivity to light and sound. Sometimes, migraines are signaled by an "aura, " which may be a visual symptom such as flashing lights or wavy lines followed by a headache. Common triggers - caffeine, stress.
Dr. Navdeep Virk
Cosmetic Dentistry 20 years experience
It also could be caused by muscle fatigue leading to pain due to improper bite
Apr 2, 2013
Dr. Osman Farooq
Pediatric Neurology 20 years experience
Migraines: A migraine is a bad headache that can come and go. It can be associated with other symptoms, such as nausea/vomiting, vision changes, sensitivity to light or sound, etc. They can be very troubling but are treatable. It would be good to get checked if you think you have migraines.
Dr. Christopher Khorsandi
Plastic Surgery 22 years experience
Nerve Compression: Migraines have been shown to arise from compression of peripheral nerves. Despite a multibillion dollar pharmaceutical industry that would like you to believe there is no cure, you can obtain significant relief with surgery. For more info and real patient stories see below: www.Themigrainereliefcneter.Com.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 52 years experience
Triggered event : All migraine headaches are triggered by external or internal events, as this can be due to changes in atmospheric pressure, emotional shifts, foods or food additives, a medication reaction, prior trauma, etc. If headaches are ongoing problem, meds are available to stop or prevent.
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Migraines: Migraines can happen spontaneously without cause. Although there can be triggers, the most common are stress, caffeine, chocolate, red wine, food with sulfates, some medications, alcohol, reflections of light.
Dr. Osman Farooq
Pediatric Neurology 20 years experience
Get checked out: A good start at finding potential headache triggers would be to maintain a diary. Every time you have a headache write down what you were doing, the foods you ate that day, alcohol, smoking, caffeine, stress, how much sleep you had the night before, eye strain, etc. Try to find patterns in your headache so that you can learn what things to avoid. Get checked by your doctor.
Dr. Yash Khanna
Family Medicine 57 years experience
Recurrent headache: Migraine is a chronic disoeder in which you get recurrent headaches which are moderate to severe in nature in typical headache it is on one sided headache and pulsating in nature and last anywhere from 2 to 72 hours it may have other associated symptoms like nausea&vomiting inreased sensitivity ti light about one in third patients feel an aura. It can be triggered by several different factors.
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Migraine: A migraine is a vasospasm of a blood vessel in the brain. There are many symptoms. The common migraine's hallmark is a severe headache. The headache may be accompanied by nausea and vomiting, sensitivity to light and sound. Sometimes, migraines are signaled by an "aura, " which may be a visual symptom such as flashing lights or wavy lines followed by a headache. Common triggers - caffeine, stress.
Dr.
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Migraine: A migraine can cause severe throbbing pain or a pulsing sensation, usually on just one side of the head. It's often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Migraine attacks can cause significant pain for hours to days and can be so severe that the pain is disabling. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/migraine-headache/home/ovc-20202432
Dr. Ayman Omar
Specializes in Neurology
Headache: Hi ChantelleH, A migraine is a type of headache. Usually it is on one side of the head, moderate to severe, throbbing and sometimes associated with sensitivity to light and sound.
Dr. Dora Chizea
Anti-Aging Medicine 48 years experience
Confirm with MD 1st: 16 year old female has migraine, wants to know what to do. Migraine Headache is a very common ailment Pain usually localized in specific areas on the head can be excruciating, pounding; tender to touch in affected area, many times associated with light and sound sensitivity, nausea or even vomiting. Shutting lights & sounds off plus many OTC analgesics could help. Be sure with MD/ Headache spec
Dr. Yash Khanna
Family Medicine 57 years experience
Try Pain Meds See MD: All i can recommend is try over the counter meds like Excdrine,Ibuprofen or Tylenol.If it does not help yu will need prescription meds from your doctor which are specific for Migraine acute attack
Dr. Robert Kneece
Specializes in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics
Find triggers: The best treatment is to find the triggers and avoid them,keep a diary,lack of sleep,too much caffeine,smoke,smells,aspartame,nuts etc.Tylenol or motrin OTC,also can try 3 mg melatonin or 400 mg Riboflavin has been shown to help prevent.Otherwise prescription for Triptans,topramax,B blockers ,phenergan.
Dr. Jaiprakash Thakor Jairam
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
?: Difficult to say.Can you please post a history of your symptoms as accurately as you can?Site of headache,duration ,other symptoms,ect would all help.
Dr. Deborah Ungerleider
Pediatrics 36 years experience
Possibly migraine: However, there are many other possible causes for headaches. They could be from not being well enough hydrated or from fatigue or a particular food or type of food. I would recommend keeping a log of your headaches along with foods eaten, amount of fluids, any meds taken, other symptoms, amount of sleep...and please see your doctor for an examination to rule out anything more serious.

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A 21-year-old female asked:

Is there any medicines for migraine?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Ann De nardin
Family Medicine 22 years experience
Many medications: Some people respond to rescue medications such as the triptan group preventative medications help lessen the frequency of migraines in other people. There are many options, such as, Botox injections, topamax, (topiramate) cymbalta, hormone therapy for females, Propranolol and others.
A 31-year-old member asked:

What to use to ease a migraine?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Qamar Khan
Pain Management 17 years experience
Migraine Tx: You may want to consider having your doctor/headache specialist see if Botox can be approved for your migraine headaches. If it works you could have significantly less migraines for at least 3-4 months at a time. Many times people's migraines are cut in half if not more. The use of your oral migraine prevention medications and abortives are much more helpful and reduce occurrences even better.
A 34-year-old member asked:

What is the treatment for migraine?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Qamar Khan
Pain Management 17 years experience
Alot but: You may want to consider having your doctor/headache specialist see if Botox can be approved for your migraine headaches. If it works you could have significantly less migraines for at least 3-4 months at a time. Many times people's migraines are cut in half if not more. The use of your oral migraine prevention medications and abortives are much more helpful and reduce occurrences even better.
A 33-year-old member asked:

What can be done about a migraine?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brett Noorda
Dentistry 25 years experience
There is no easy way: When it comes to migraines, there is no definitive way. You must, through trial and error, figure out what triggers your migraines and eliminate that from your life. Triggers are unique to everyone, so there is no pat answer--if there was, it would be common knowledge. Figuring this out takes a lot of effort and time. A good migraine doctor can help you along the path.
A 48-year-old member asked:

How can you tell if you have a migraine?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 52 years experience
Bad experience: Some pts have auras, or premonitory symptoms, which include bright spots before the eyes, light flashes, perhaps numbness over face, mouth or arm, and speech problems perhaps. The headache typically is unilateral, throbbing, associated with light and noise sensitivity, nausea, and vomiting. The duration is often 6-8 hrs, but up to 2-3 days in a few unfortunates. If familiar, see doctor.

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