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A 39-year-old member asked:

What can i do to stop snoring?

36 doctor answers69 doctors weighed in
Dr. Anifat Balogun
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 29 years experience
Stop Snoring: Multiple factors contribute to snoring. These can include anatomic issues such as a deviated septum, long or low lying palate, a small jaw, a large tongue, a short, thick neck as well as carrying extra weight in the abdomen. Once sleep apnea is ruled out, things like breathe right strips, weight loss and oral appliances can be tried. Septal deviation and palate issues can be surgically corrected.
Dr. Carlo Hatem
Pulmonary Critical Care 25 years experience
Sleep study: See a sleep specialist and discuss a sleep study. Snoring means that you are having a hard time getting air into your lungs. This is often seen with sleep apnea.
Dr. David Wyatt
Family Medicine 26 years experience
Apnea?: If your overweight, losing weight can make a huge difference in your snoring and /or apnea. May need sleep study and CPAP to be able to rest in order to be able to lose weight
Dr. Brian Oyler
Dr. Brian Oyler commented
General Practice 27 years experience
A dentist may also be able to make you a splint to reposition your jaw and stop the snoring.
Jul 18, 2012
Dr. Jeffrey Jarvis
Dentistry 37 years experience
Depends on the cause: If you have primary snoring only, without sleep apnea (sa), try simple things like weight loss, sleep on your side, avoid sedatives and alcohol prior to bedtime, etc. But if you are a robust snorer, see your md for a sleep study to determine if you have sa. This is a more serious problem than just making noise, and needs treatment from your md and possibly your dentist.
Dr. Paul Grin
Pain Management 36 years experience
Snoring-red flag: Snoring, the noise that emanates from the soft tissues of the oropharyngeal walls during inspiration. Although snoring seems physically harmless, it can be a “red flag” for a much more serious and sometimes fatal condition called obstructive sleep apnea (osa). The oral appliance therapy is the answer in many cases. Rec, see orofacial pain and sleep medicine specialist.
Dr. Clifton Schermerhorn
General Practice 40 years experience
No short answer: Snoring can be a sign of sleep apnea...It needs to be evaluated and treated...If it is that much of a problem, you should see your family doc for a check-up and possible referral for a sleep study at a sleep disorder clinic..Also, try to avoid sleeping on your back..
Dr. Jeffrey Jarvis
Dentistry 37 years experience
A couple things: If you are just snoring, you can try a few simple things....Sleep on your side (they make t-shirts with tennis-balls in the back to help keep you on your side), avoid alcohol and sedative close to bedtime, and lose weight. If you are a heavy snorer, talk to your md about getting a sleep study to check for sleep apnea. This is a more serious problem that needs treatment.
Dr. Patricia Mcgarry
Cosmetic Dentistry 36 years experience
CPAP,Sleep Appliance: A CPAP is the gold standard to treat sleep apnea. For mild to moderate apneas an appliance can be made that will move your jaw forward to allow more air in when you sleep.
Dr. Jeffrey Jarvis
Dentistry 37 years experience
Several things: If you are just a primary snorer, you can try simple things, like sleeping on your back (they sell t-shirts with tennis balls on the back), avoid alcohol and sedatives, and lose weight. If you are a robust snorer, you may have a conditon called sleep apnea which can be quite serious. See your md for a sleep study to determine this, and to discuss options.
Dr. David May
Dr. David May commented
Dentistry 30 years experience
Avoid sleeping on your back
Dec 17, 2012
Dr. James Donley
Dentistry 54 years experience
Sleep on your side: If you are a mild snorer, sleeping on your side may be all you need to do. A bumper belt can help. If your snoring is more vigorous, you may have sleep apnea. You need to see your doctor who can order a sleep study. If you have sleep apnea options usually include a cpap, surgery or a special dental appliance. A dental appliance should only be provided by a dentist trained in dental sleep medicine.
Dr. David May
Dentistry 30 years experience
Avoid sedituves: Avoid alcohol and other sedatives. Avoid smoking. Lose weight. Avoid sleeping on your back. If these don't work, then you need to see a sleep physician who will decide if you need a sleep study. The medical solutions include cpap, surgery and an oral appliance.
Dr. Ronald Achong
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 18 years experience
Many options.: Snoring can be a sign of sleep apnea. May want to have a sleep study performed. Your family md can order a sleep study and one can be performed at a sleep center. Consult and ENT and an oral surgeon afterwards for surgical options, CPAP and an oral appliance.
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
Dentistry 45 years experience
CPAP alternatives: I agree that a sleep study is in order. Often, if there is no diagnosis of sleep apnea, an oral mouthpiece may suffice in helping the snoring problem diminish or go away. Your md/do should be consulted first.
Dr. PAUL Christu
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 44 years experience
Lose weight: Losing weight, sleeping on your side, and treating nasal allergies all may help. If snoring continues you may need a sleep study, especially if you wake up exhausted every day or feel sleepy in the afternoon.
Dr. Matthew Giulianelli
Dentistry 16 years experience
Consultation : A few things you can do here. You can see a physician or dentist trained in evaluating for sleep disorders. 80% of people who snore may have obstructive sleep apnea. It could also be related to other structures, such as tonsils, adenoids, creating obstructions in your airway. I would recommend seeking a consultation first, then seeing if you need a sleep study to rule out sleep apnea.
Dr. Robert Ryan
Dentistry 50 years experience
Oral appliance: See a dentist trained in sleep medicine. He or she can create an oral appliance that can control snoring. You might also have sleep apnea? This needs to be evaluated by a trained individual, but significant help is available to you.
Dr. Glenn MacFarlane
Cosmetic Dentistry 36 years experience
STOP SNORING: Snoring may be a symptom for a larger problem called obstructive sleep apnea which can be deadly. I'm not trying to scare you but you should see your internist and have him rx a sleep study to rule out any breathing disorder. If you have a mild to moderate problem, sleep appliances are available that work wonders.
Dr. Mark Birnbach
Cosmetic Dentistry 48 years experience
Snoring: Weight loss, avoiding sleeping on your back ( sew a pocket onto the back of a t-shirt and stick a tennis ball in it), breath rite strips, decongestants. See an ENT to evaluate tonsils, adenoids and sinus.
Dr. James Courey
Specializes in Prosthodontics
Depends on the cause: Snoring is a significant problem for many people, & often goes undiagnosed or gets passed off as an irritation. A great place to start is an examination by an ear, nose, & throat doctor and a sleep study. Sleep apnea, a serious and potentially life threatening condition, should be ruled out or diagnosed through a sleep a study. Based on findings, options will be presented. Good luck.
Dr. Mark Birnbach
Cosmetic Dentistry 48 years experience
Snoring: Several possibilities: some people only snore if they sleep on their back, so try avoiding that. Losing weight. See an ear nose & throat specialist to evaluate your tonsils, adenoids and sinus wear a custom made dental device that holds your jaw forward while you sleep thereby increasing the airway.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
I would recommend: Evaluation by your physician or an ear/nose/throat specialist to determine the cause of your snoring. Sometimes it can be alleviated - other times not.
Dr. Mark Birnbach
Cosmetic Dentistry 48 years experience
Treating snoring: Several options snoring is often worse if you sleep on your back, so avoid that position ( sew a pocket on the back of a t-shirt and put a tennis ball in it) lose weight see an ENT to evaluate tonsils, adenoids, deviated septum use nasal rinses and breath right strips to open nasal passages if you have allergies, take your medication.
Dr. Paul Grin
Pain Management 36 years experience
See a sleep doctor: The frequent, loud snoring could be a sign of sleep apnea disorder that affects your breathing and oxygen level. If left untreated, sleep apnea can result in a number of a serious health problems.
Dr. Chirag Patel
Specializes in Neurology
Find the cause first: Many factors can lead to snoring: the anatomy of your mouth and sinuses, alcohol consumption, allergies, a cold, and your weight. If you wake up with unrefreshed sleep or doze off during the daytime, you may be at risk for obstructive sleep apnea. See your PCP for further evaluation of the snoring. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003207.htm
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Agree w Dr Patel: The reason for the snoring needs to be determined before a fix can be identified. Sometimes a sleep study is needed for this reason.
Dr. Michael Kleerekoper
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Snoring: Tough call! I would start with a consult to either a pulmonary or an ear nose and throat doctor
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Snoring: The reason for the snoring needs to be determined before a fix can be identified. Sometimes a sleep study is needed for this reason.
Dr. Zeyad Morcos
Neurology 22 years experience
Snoring: As sleep medicine specialist, snoring has many possibilities, etiologies, and could herald the "serious sleep apnea". Kindly speak to your doctor.
Dr. Stuart Hickerson
Family Medicine 32 years experience
Snoring: Usually snoring is associated with weight and or allergies especially allergic rhinitis. Some things to try to relieve symptoms are water close to bed time and nasal SALINE. I use snore away spray at times and it can help. So does nasal strips
Dr. Robert Douglas
Orthodontics 51 years experience
See sleep DDS: A dentist who specializes in sleep apnea and snoring prevention can provide you with a device worn at night that will stop your snoring and perhaps give you a more restful night's sleep.
Dr. Pierrette Mimi Poinsett
Pediatrics 38 years experience
Snoring may also indicate obstructive sleep apnea. Also recommend evaluation by pulmonologist who may also recommend a sleep study.
Dec 30, 2016
Dr. Debra Rosenblatt
Dentistry 38 years experience
See below: Sleep apnea must have a medical diagnosis, and one modality of treatment can be an oral appliance with an MD clearance. The oral appliance may be fabricated by your DDS, medicare covers a certain type of oral appliance.
Dr. Edwin Ishoo
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Snoring: Before you can talk about treatment options, you need to find out why you snore and if there is sleep apnea as well. You need a full physical exam, especially head and neck anatomy, your BMI, sleep study etc. Then a treatment can be planned to target your needs.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
Agree w Dr. Ishoo: The reason for the snoring needs to be determined before a fix can be identified. Sometimes a sleep study is needed for this reason.
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
Neurology 33 years experience
Get sleep study: Find out if you suffer from obstructive sleep apnea or not. Treatment may hinge in that balance first.
Dr. John Feola
Internal Medicine 31 years experience
OSA EVALUATION : OSA can be suggested by history and physical. Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL.
Dr. Richard Romano
Internal Medicine 9 years experience
Snoring: The best way to answer this is getting a sleeping test, which can evaluate the problem. Losing weight can be a cure.

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Similar questions

A 39-year-old member asked:

How can you stop bad snoring?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Courey
Specializes in Prosthodontics
Depends on the cause: Snoring is a significant problem for many people, & often goes undiagnosed or gets passed off as an irritation. A great place to start is an examination by an ear, nose, & throat doctor and a sleep study. Sleep apnea, a serious and potentially life threatening condition, should be ruled out or diagnosed through a sleep a study. Based on findings, options will be presented. Good luck.
A 45-year-old member asked:

What can be done to stop snoring?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Birnbach
Cosmetic Dentistry 48 years experience
Snoring: Avoid sleeping on your back ( sew a tennis ball into a pocket on the back of a t-shirt) lose weight see and ENT to be sure there aren't any nasal obstructions take medication for allergies use breathe rite strips have a dentist custom make an oral appliance.
A 48-year-old member asked:

What remedies are there to stop snoring?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Loury
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 39 years experience
See below: First need to make sure not from sleep apnea. Snoring noise usually from palate vibration so laser, radio frequency, implants and palate injections stiffen palate so less noise. Some with nasal obstruction improve with better nasal airflow. Weight loss if obese. Avoid alcohol and sedating meds.
A 33-year-old member asked:

How can I stop my husband from snoring?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Anna Guarna
Dentistry 35 years experience
Different methods : Snoring has a many causes, so determing what the cause is would be the first step. It is important to determine whether he has accompanying sleep apnea. Depending on the cause there are treatments that range from, reducing the soft palate tissue (surgucally/with laser), a CPAP device, or even a dental mouth piece that can reposition the jaw. Nasal breathing strips may help allow better airflow.
A 42-year-old member asked:

How can I stop my snoring problem?

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeffrey Jarvis
Dentistry 37 years experience
A couple of things: First try simple stuff like have try sleeping on your side. Also avoid excess alcohol before bed, consider weight loss, and you might want to get a sleep study to dertermine if you have sleep apnea. It is a more serious problem. A dentist may be able to help you with a mouthpiece appliance as well.

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