U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 30-year-old member asked:

What anesthesia is used for people with inguinal hernias?

3 doctor answers11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Julian Goldman
Anesthesiology 36 years experience
A variety: Depending on the patient, surgeon (and planned repair), anesthesiologist, and practice setting, inguinal hernia repair may be performed under local, regional, or general anesthesia. You should ask your surgeon if the operation will require a specific anesthetic, or if you and your anesthesiologist can decide. For example, a very complex hernia may be too uncomfortable to repair without general.
Dr. Richard Pollard
Anesthesiology 30 years experience
Sedation or General: It depends on the surgical approach. If the surgeon is using a laparoscopic approach you will want to be asleep under general anesthesia. If the surgeon uses an open technique then sedation or with local anesthesia is usually sufficient.
Dr. David Earle
General Surgery 31 years experience
Depends: Most patients choose general anesthesia regardless of the approach. In general, it is easier to do an open technik with local anesthesia and sedation, but I have performed many laparoscopic hernia repairs with local anesthesia and mild sedation as well. In these cases, the patients are usually thinner, and have small hernias and are highly motivated to undergo local anesthesia with sedation.
Dr. Boris Aronzon
Anesthesiology 24 years experience
I would not recommend laparoscopic hernia repair under sedation, as described in the answer above, general anesthesia is the best choice.
Apr 2, 2013
Dr. David Earle
Dr. David Earle commented
General Surgery 31 years experience
Provided original answer
That is a common misconception. I have performed this successfully in about 40 patients, And had my own hernias repaired laparoscopically under local anesthesia with sedation. It is clearly an option, but not for all patients.
Apr 2, 2013

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership
Last updated Nov 28, 2017

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.