U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 39-year-old member asked:

what steps can be taken to reduce massive tooth decay?

5 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gary Sandler
Dentistry 54 years experience
Prevention and DDS: You can prevent tooth decay with good oral hygiene- tooth brushing, flossing and a diet that does not promote tooth decay. Once a tooth has decay, it needs to be treated by a dentist. Otherwise it will just progress and lead to tooth loss.
Dr. Don Millner
Cosmetic Dentistry 43 years experience
Ideal oral hygiene!: Floss daily (by far the most important thing you can do, ); brush carefully, watch your intake and frequency of sugars. An unacceptable alternative would be full mouth extractions. No teeth ..... No decay!
Dr. Jeffrey Collura
Cosmetic Dentistry 14 years experience
See a dentist: Get the decay treated, get oral hygiene instructions and a cleaning. See your dentist on a regular basis. You are fighting a losing battle without professional care.
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
Dentistry 36 years experience
Diet and oral hygien: Cleaning you teeth with good brushing and flossing is essential. You need to have a diet low in sugar. Drink water and avoid soda, energy drinks. Flavored ice teas, even diet drinks are bad for teeth. Using xylitol mints or gum after eating will help to eliminate the decay causing bacteria. And have your decayed teeth treated!
Dr. Arnold Malerman
Orthodontics 53 years experience
Decay: Your treatment options depend on the severity & extent of your disease. You will need to see a Dentist for a comprehensive examination and imaging to determine the extent of your problem. Based on his/her diagnosis of your current condition, treatment options can then be discussed.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership

Similar questions

A 29-year-old member asked:

Is it possible for tooth decay to cause neurological side effects?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven J Harpole
Dentistry 33 years experience
Not likely : Not unless the tooth decay has reached the pulp or living section of the tooth. You would have what is better known as a tooth abscess at that point ...Depending whether it is acute or chronic may determine the level of pain which in turn could possibly lead to neurological side effects! would certainly expedite the time one would seek professional help ....
A 34-year-old member asked:

Does tooth decay spread from one tooth to another?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Anna Guarna
Dentistry 35 years experience
Yes: This can happen , especially when teeth "touch" each other...Either side by side or top and bottom.
A 36-year-old member asked:

If you have tooth decay do you also have cavities?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Thomas Davis
Dentistry 36 years experience
Decay: Cavities/decay are the same. Another name is caries.
A 38-year-old member asked:

What to do about a very deep tooth decay?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Phillip Frist
Dentistry 46 years experience
See your dentist: You must have your dentist remove the decay and place a restoration. If not the decay will get into the nerve then you have a tooth ache, infection and need a root canal and probably a crown. Dosent a restoration sound better?
Ghana
A 36-year-old male asked:

What is tooth decay?

8 doctor answers18 doctors weighed in
Dr. Phillip Frist
Dentistry 46 years experience
Bacteria destruction: Decay is usually caused due to plaque build up on or between your teeth, then the bacteria metabolize the sugars you eat and their byproduct is acid which eats into the outer layer of the enamel. After enough destruction the process enters the softer dentine below the enamel. Now you have a cavity.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership
Last updated Apr 24, 2020

People also asked

Related topics

Connect with a U.S. board-certified doctor by text or video anytime, anywhere.
$30 per visit with
membership

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.