A member asked:

Can claudication be a possible symptom of peripheral arterial disease?

12 doctors weighed in across 3 answers
Dr. Wendell Goins answered

Specializes in Vascular Surgery

Yes: Patients with intermittant claudication(pain with walking, usually involving the calf muscles, but can be higher)may have blockages or narrowing of their arteries that go to the leg, thereby decreasing the amount of available oxygen for active muscles.

Answered 1/18/2013

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Dr. James Wilentz answered

Specializes in Cardiology

A principal symptom: Claudication, or the tensing up of the calf muscles during walking, is the main symptom of peripheral arterial disease. It is caused by blockages in the arteries that give blood supply to the calf muscles. Claudication may be called "intermittent" because it goes away when one stops walking and may recur on resuming walking -unlike spinal stenosis which causes rest pain down the legs.

Answered 9/29/2016

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Dr. Benjamin Lerner answered

Specializes in Vascular Surgery

Absolutely: Claudication is one of the cardinal signs of pad.

Answered 3/26/2013

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