A member asked:

What is the definition or description of: total and direct neonatal bilirubin?

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Dr. Mark Patterson answered

Specializes in Pediatrics

Causes jaundice: Bilirubin is a breakdown product of heme (found in red blood cells) metabolism. It consists of both direct (water soluble) and indirect (water insoluble) forms. In a newborn, most of the bilirubin is in the indirect form. If the level gets high, it causes neonatal jaundice. See your pediatrician if your newborn looks yellow (jaundiced) or you have concerns.

Answered 12/18/2012

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Dr. Ecaterina Sartina answered

Specializes in Pediatrics

Bilirubin: Bilirubin is a product of degradation of the red blood cells (rbc). When the bilirubin is in excess in the blood, than jaundice occurs (total bilirubin elevated). Neonates have a limited liver ability to clear up the bilirubin. Normally bilirubin processed by liver & become-conjugated (direct), ready to be excreeted. The excess of bilirubin which left, free, is unconjugated (indirect) & is toxic.

Answered 12/9/2013

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Related Questions

A member asked:

My new born baby (10 Days ) have bilirubin level in 19.4. Is it normal ?

2 doctors weighed in across 2 answers