A female asked:
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what is it called when you have vericose vein that are painful to the touch and also bulging out? what are some preventative test to take if you have a lot of vericose veins or what doctor do you see for this problem?

7 doctor answers
Dr. Robert Andrews
36 years experience Interventional Radiology
By : By definition, a vein has to be bulging out before you can call it varicose. Varicose veins can be tender to the touch, but if this is a new or sudden change, it could reflect something called superficial thrombophlebitis. Usually, this responds to warm compresses and medications like ibuprofen. The best way to keep varicose veins from causing pain or getting worse is to wear compression stockings. If that doesn't work, or if you can't tolerate the stockings, the veins can be treated by a variety of means that depend on what's causing them. A complete evaluation requires a history and physical examination by a doctor, and usually also an ultrasound study. The general name for doctors who treat this problem is phlebologist, but interventional radiologists, vascular surgeons, and a lot of other specialists are cross-trained to take care of vein problems. Here's a link to try: http://doctor-finder.Sirweb.Org.
Answered on Oct 3, 2016
Dr. Ellen Dillavou
25 years experience Vascular Surgery
You : You have nailed it! these are varicose veins - veins that bulge above the skin, are painful to touch, itch or are associated with aching or swollen legs. These veins are not usually a dangerous problem but can be an unsightly and uncomfortable. There are many doctors that treat varicose veins, but you are probably best treated by going to a vascular surgeon or an licensed phlebologist. While there is nothing that can truly prevent varicose veins if you are disposed to them, compression stockings can make you legs more comfortable and also diminish swelling. Also, most insurance companies require patients to try compression stockings to see if these adequately treat your symptoms before they authorize any procedures. There are a variety of procedures to eliminate or decrease varicose veins, most done in the office.
Answered on Oct 3, 2016
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Dr. Paul Bressman
50 years experience Vascular Surgery
Bulging : Bulging and painful varicose veins that remain tender when the foot is elevated above the heart, especially if they don't collapse and remain tender, suggests that this is a condition called superficial phlebitis (svt). If the veins collapse when the leg is elevated and if the tenderness and symptoms subside within 15 minutes then this a chronic venous insufficiency (cvi). Svt will respond to non steroidal analagesics such as motrin/ibuprofen and mobic, (meloxicam) and elastic crompression stockings about 75% of the time. Antibiotics are not necessary. If the vein becomes inflammed (reddened) and starts to progress close to the groin there is a danger that this may become a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and this must be urgently evaluated with duplex ultrasound by a competent specialist. With cvi the symptoms are long standing and wearing a 20 -30 or a 30 - 40 mm hg compression stocking will moderate your symptoms. Long standing untreated varicose veins can lead to leg swelling (edema) chronic skin changes (darkening of pigmentation and venous eczema), itching, and fatigue and tenderness which will impair your quality of life and limit your activities and your work ability. Seek care from a specialist in this field (phlebology) from organizations such as the american college of phebology or the american board of phlebology.
Answered on Jan 5, 2019
Dr. James Isobe
54 years experience Phlebology
Ropy, : Ropy, bulging veins are a result of incompetent or leaky valves within the superficial veins known as the great saphenous vein, accessory veins(anterior or posterior accessory), and small saphenous vein. They can arise from leaky venous valves in the perforator system which joins the deep venous system with the superficial venous system. This is called chronic venous insufficiency, and the ropy bulging veins may become tender to touch, especially at the end of the day. Other typical symptoms include burning, stinging, heaviness, fatigue, swelling of the legs. There may be brownish skin discoloration about the ankle area, and even thickening of the skin in legs. Ropy, bulging veins with surrounding redness, heat, tenderness to touch, and somewhat firm may be superficial phlebitis which is a clot within the vein. When extensive, they may migrate into the deep system, and one should see a phlebologist for evaluation and treatment. The risk factors of developing ropy vv is heredity, obesity, pregnancy, lifestyle (standing on feet for prolonged periods), and age; so, as you can see, there are not good ways to prevent the development of vv. Animals walking on four feet do not have ropy vv, but i would not suggest this as a means to prevent your vv. The workup by the phlebologist would start with an ultrasound of the deep and superficial system, and a general examination and focusing on the legs. Today there are good, outpatient treatment methods for this problem which are very successful.
Answered on Oct 4, 2016
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Dr. John Landi
47 years experience Phlebology
Bulging Veins.: Varicose veins are bulging grape-like appearing veins which are most commonly seen on the legs. These are due to leaking(refluxing) valves usually in the saphenous system. Some causes include hereditary, pregnancy, trauma and aging. The gold standard of treatment is to have a venous reflux ultrasound to both diagnose and form a treatment plan. You should see a vein specialist.
Answered on Dec 10, 2013
Dr. Joel Gotvald
25 years experience Vascular Surgery
See Vascular Surgeon: See a vascular surgeon for this condition. What you describe is venous reflux disease resulting in varicose veins. You should get a venous reflux ultrasound & begin wearing compression stockings. You likely are a candidate for a therapy to cure the condition, which is most typically a endovenous thermal ablation of an incompetent leg vein. The disease will tend to get worse without therapy. See MD
Answered on May 3, 2016
Dr. Gary Cunningham
34 years experience Phlebology
A painful bulging: vein may be inflamed (phlebitis). If it is hard, there may be a blood clot. If a clot forms, there is often little to be done other than wait, perhaps use some anti-inflammatory medicine, and, in some cases, maybe blood thinners. Support hose, regular exercise, and periodic leg elevation may help symptoms but will not fix the veins. However, a phlebologist can eliminate the varicose veins.
Answered on Aug 17, 2015

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