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A 49-year-old female asked:

chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (cll) is cll terminal? is there a cure?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lauren Stegman
Radiation Oncology 27 years experience
CLL : Cll is a very slow growing type of cancer. Most patients are diagnosed in the earlier stages of the disease and more than half of them will live a 12 years or longer with the disease. Often no treatment is needed at first. Treatment can be started if special genetic testing of the cancer cells shows a high-risk type or if the patient is very symptomatic. Treatment can include oral or IV chemotherapy or IV infusion of a special antibodies (rituxan (rituximab) or Campath ). Unfortunately, these treatments are not curative, but they can keep the disease in check for many years. The only known cure for cll is a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. A transplant is a difficult treatment to go through with a high risk for complications, so they are usually reserved for young patients, with high-risk disease.
Dr. Bates Moses
Palliative Care 22 years experience
Variable: There is a variety of factors to consider and prognosis depends on several factors such as level of white blood cell counts, red cell counts, platelets, size of involved organs, and so on. Some for some might be a few years, for others decades and may eventually die from something else. The oncologist can provide more detailed information but remember averages are just averages and may not apply.
Dr. Agos Luca
Specializes in Pathology
See below...: Chronic lymphoblastic leukemia does not exist. Cll stands for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Lymphoblastic leukemias are acute.The only known complete cure for cll is stem cell transplantation; however, many patients do not need any form of therapy unless there are symptoms or adverse prognostic factors. Cll is usually not an aggressive form of leukemia and has a relatively good prognosis overall.

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A 21-year-old member asked:

What is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all)?

4 doctor answers11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Noga
Medical Oncology 34 years experience
Lymph system cancer: Lymphocytes are normal cells of the immune system that protects the body from infection. When these cells become cancerous, they grow out of control in the bone marrow, blood and other organs. All is very common in children but can occur in adults. With children, it is truly one of our success stories thanks to clinical trials with cure rates above 90%. Adults do not do as well.
A 33-year-old member asked:

Can you have leukemia and not anemia?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Thompson
Hematology and Oncology 20 years experience
Yes: Advanced leukemia of any sort (aml, all, cml, cll) can lead to anemia. However, early leukemia (rai 0 cll) may not result in anemia.
A 53-year-old member asked:

I want to know what is the difference between anemia and leukemia?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Thompson
Hematology and Oncology 20 years experience
Different cells: Emia = blood. An-emia = lack of red blood cells (low hgb) associated with fatigue leukocytosis = more white blood cells (WBC) in the blood. One cause of leukocytosis is an increase in WBC cancer cell called leukemia.
CA
A 42-year-old member asked:

Is it possible for someone to have leukemia and not anemia?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Noga
Medical Oncology 34 years experience
Yes: Depending on the type of leukemia, this is possible. For example, chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a slowly prgressive disease and it may take a while before the marrow becomes significantly involved to the point of affecting the red blood cells. Also, in the early stages of leukemia, anemia may not be present.
A 48-year-old member asked:

Could the disease leukopenia lead to leukemia?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Noga
Medical Oncology 34 years experience
Possibly: There are a lot of reasons for leukopenia. Usually isolated low white cells is not a sign of leukemia if the red blood cells and the platelets also found in blood are fine. Leukopenia develops in leukemia because all the bone marrow cells that eventually end up in the blood stream are crowded out by leukemia cells.

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Last updated Oct 3, 2016

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