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A 33-year-old member asked:

how do you treat pterygium inversum ungulis?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Heidi Gilchrist
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Hm, you can't always: Nail pterygia are most commonly caused by lichen planus. Sometimes injections of steroids in the nail matrix (root) can help, although these can be fairly painful. Often though, the damage to the nail can't be repaired once it has occured.

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A member asked:

What are the most common symptoms of pterygium?

6 doctor answers21 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
See in the mirror: Pterygium is a benign, but sometimes icky looking growth on either side of the colored part of the eye (cornea) felt to be an exaggerated response to wind, dust and sunlight. Some are minor, but some get quite red and a few grow sufficiently far over the cornea to threaten vision. Usually they do not cause any discomfort. See your ophthalmologist if you have a big one.
A member asked:

How can I treat pterygium?

4 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
You cannot: Pterygium is a benign growth on the nasal and temporal side of the cornea. It has hereditary underpinnings, but is a response to wind and dust and sunlight. When small you can ignore it. If larger, or actively growing it may cause redness and irritation. If very large it can be unsightly and may obstruct the vision. You ophthalmologist can advise you and offer treatment if needed.
A member asked:

My mom gets pterygium, so am I likely to get it later?

3 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Possibly: Pterygium, a non-malignant growth next to the cornea, has a modest hereditary component. If you are exposed to the same environmental influences -sunlight, dust, wind - you probably have a slightly higher risk than the average. Since this is mostly benign, and can be treated, do not worry about it. You will see it in the mirror if it happens.
A 33-year-old member asked:

Is there any way pterygium can be treated?

4 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gregory Hines
Family Medicine 24 years experience
Certainly: Ophthalmologists remove them all the time. However, the only time you really need to have it removed is when it occludes the visual field, so most that are lateral to the pupil do not require any specific treatment.
A 38-year-old member asked:

Are pterygia common among airline pilots and people living in tropical countries?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
No and yes: I know of no study showing airline pilots having an increased incidence of pterygia. They are more common in people from equatorial countries as well as those living in desert and harsh climates.

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Last updated Dec 29, 2016

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