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A 45-year-old member asked:

How to treat stress cardiomyopathy "broken heart syndrome"?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Abby Caplin
Integrative Medicine 40 years experience
With compassion: The best thing to help relieve a "broken heart syndrome" is the presence of a compassionate person. It's important to seek out a psychotherapist with expertise in grief counseling. If the problem occurred because of physical stress, counseling is still very much indicated, particularly with someone trained in mind-body medicine.

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A 31-year-old member asked:

What is stress cardiomyopathy "broken heart syndrome"?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Patrick Callahan
Pediatric Cardiology 31 years experience
Temporary weak heart: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a weakening of the heart often associated with emotional stress. Not resulting from a coronary problem a ballooning of the apex of the heart is seen with poor function. May be very sick at presentation but with supportive care (sometimes requiring balloon pump) usually recover. Medications that stimulate the heart (inotropes) may actually make the situation worse.

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Last updated Jul 10, 2018
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