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A 40-year-old male asked:

how is hiv treated?

1 doctor answer5 doctors weighed in
Dr. George Valdez
Specializes in Family Medicine
Medication: There are different virus strains, so depending on this and several other factors, the doctor will prescribe anti-viral medication.
Dr. Martin Raff
Dr. Martin Raff commented
Infectious Disease 56 years experience
Antiviral medications will always be used in combinations, so as to minimize the development of resistance in this virus that mutates continually. These meds must be carefully tailored to the patient as well as to the strain of virus identified and its sensitivity to different classes of drugs. See an expert in HIV treatment.
Oct 15, 2013

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A 32-year-old member asked:

What is hiv?

16 doctor answers33 doctors weighed in
Dr. Pam Yoder
Specializes in Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Top resource for HIV: People in north america wanting basic and advanced information about the disease HIV or aids, diagnosis and treatment, resources, caregiving and prevention should start with this from the cdc: http://www.Cdc.Gov/hiv/topics/basic/index.Htm#hiv.
A 21-year-old member asked:

How prevalent is HIV across the world?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Marianne DiNapoli
Dr. Marianne DiNapolianswered
Obstetrics and Gynecology 8 years experience
1% aged 15-49: According to 2006 data, an estimated 1% of the world's population aged 15-49 has HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). This equals 33.4 million people. The majority of infections worldwide are in sub-saharan africa.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Are there any legal ramifications for being infected by someone with hiv?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lester Thompson
Pathology 33 years experience
Perhaps: We all have an ethical and moral obligation to alert someone to an infectious disease or carrier state before engaging in any high risk behavior. So if you know you have HIV and you don't tell a potential partner, you are certainly ethically and morally obligated to tell them. There are occasionally legal issues that develop.
A 37-year-old member asked:

Can HIV be cured if it's treated quickly?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Camilla Graham
Infectious Disease 27 years experience
No, unfortunately: Once HIV is detected, it has gotten into cells in the body and we do not currently know how to completely eliminate (cure) this infection. It does look like early antiretroviral therapy may provide benefit in terms of stabilizing the immune system. See a doctor as soon as possible if you have any suspicion that you could have gotten hiv.
A 42-year-old member asked:

Can HIV be treated, if so how? Can any docs explain?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Daniel Lee
Internal Medicine 26 years experience
Antiretroviral meds: Yes, HIV can be treated with anti-HIV medications, called antiretroviral therapy. This usually consists of at least 3 medications to fight HIV. If you have HIV, I would recommend that you seek medical care with a medical provider that has experience with HIV. If you don't have insurance, you can still get medical care through Ryan White Insurance, which covers medical care and meds for HIV.

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