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A 38-year-old member asked:

Is it possible for thrombocytopenia to affect morbidity?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barry Rosen
General Surgery 35 years experience
Yes: Platelets are little plugs present in the bloodstream which control bleeding from small blood vessels. Minor decreases in platelet counts should have no effect on most people, yet moderate decreases can lead to problems following trauma or surgery; at very low levels, spontaneous bleeding may occur, which can be life-threatening.
Dr. Steven Ajluni
Cardiology 36 years experience
Yes: Low platelet counts can affect morbidity and mortality through the increased risk of bleeding. The severity of the bleed will dictate just how bad the consequences are but any part of your body could be affected particularly with platelet counts below 50, 000.

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Last updated Jul 30, 2013

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