U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 41-year-old member asked:

How does this mrcp test work?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mazen Ghani
Radiology 24 years experience
MRCP: Mrcp (magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) is a type of MRI scan that evaluates the pancreas, bile ducts, gallbladder, and liver. It requires no intravenous contrast. The MRI tech will take images while you lay in the scanner. You will hear loud banging noises from the scanner.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership

Similar questions

A 37-year-old member asked:

What is an mrcp, and how does it work?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Joseph Roosth
Internal Medicine 35 years experience
Gallstones: Mrcp is an MRI test used mainly to look for gallstones trapped in the ducts leading from the gallbladder to the stomach and inside of the liver. In a simple sense it is a computer enhanced method to look for such stones without doing a more invasive procedure called an ercp. Can also be used to look for cancers/other lesions that put pressure on the bile ducts of the liver/ductal narrowings.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership
Last updated Sep 20, 2017

People also asked

Related topics

Connect with a U.S. board-certified doctor by text or video anytime, anywhere.
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.