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A 47-year-old member asked:

what is polycystic ovarian disease like?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bryan Treacy
Gynecology 35 years experience
Yes: Pcos seems to be lifelong. It is a disorder characterized by menstrual irregularities, reversed ratio of fshto lh, elevated ovarian testosterone production, anovulation, Insulin resistance, higher risk of early uterine cancer, hirsutism and infertility. Weight is typically above normal & involves Insulin resistance & circulating testosterone levels.

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A 35-year-old member asked:

Is polycystic ovarian disease curable?

8 doctor answers31 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Lang
Endocrinology 52 years experience
Sometimes: Polycystic ovaries is not a disease, it is a syndrome because there are many different conditions that can contribute to developing polycystic ovaries. One of these, excessive weight gain, can be reversed with life style changes. However, because it is known that Insulin stimulates the ovaries to make testosterone and this can lead to cystic ovaries, a low carb diet is most likely to help.
A 44-year-old member asked:

Is there anything I can get from the grocery store or drug store for polycystic ovarian disease until I can see a doctor?

3 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dennis Higginbotham
Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 years experience
No: There are no over the counter treatments for pcos. The first line treatment for most women is cycle control with birth control pills. If that is not an option, then some women with pcos are treated with Progesterone alone to regulate the cycle.
CA
A 25-year-old member asked:

How come I have polycystic ovarian disease, but nobody else in the family has it?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dennis Higginbotham
Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 years experience
Not genetic: Pcos is not a genetic disorder. It can occur in any woman, but is most often seen in overweight women. But, certainly not all overweight women develop pcos.
A 25-year-old member asked:

Is there a cure for polycystic ovarian disease?

3 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dennis Higginbotham
Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 years experience
Weight loss: The usual treatment for pcos is cycle control with birth control pills. However, the majority of women with pcos are overweight, and weight loss will return the cycles to normal in the majority of them. While weight loss may not be easy, it is quite effective in normalizing the menstrual cycle for those who are able to lose in the range of 30 pounds.
A 48-year-old member asked:

What can I use for polycystic ovarian disease if I don't have a doctor?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dennis Higginbotham
Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 years experience
Weight loss: The usual treatment for pcos is cycle control with birth control pills. However, the majority of women with pcos are overweight, and weight loss will return the cycles to normal in the majority of them. While weight loss may not be easy, it is quite effective in normalizing the menstrual cycle for those who are able to lose in the range of 30 pounds.

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Last updated Jun 25, 2014

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