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A 37-year-old member asked:

Does regular aerobic exercise lower an individual's risk of developing cancer?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology 49 years experience
Yes: Exercise, through control of obesity and additional mechanisms that are not fully defined, reduces the risk of cancer. It is even more important in reducing mortality from cardiovascular disease.
Dr. Joseph Woods
Pathology 28 years experience
Likely yes.: This likely lowers a person's risk for cancer since it helps the cardiovascular system and keeps a person active. This likely helps the body to be purged of residual waste and toxins that might indirectly lead to cancer, and keeps one from leadxing a sedentary lifestyle. Such a life could lead to over-indulgance of food, alcohol, cigerrettes, which could clearly predispose to many a cancer.

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A 42-year-old member asked:

Does regular participation in aerobic exercise lower an individual's risk of developing cancer?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Chaim Colen
Neurosurgery 19 years experience
Indeed: Maintaining a healthy lifestyle including regular exercise and healthy diet can assist in reducing cancer risk.

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Last updated Nov 7, 2012

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