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A 25-year-old member asked:

are there any substitute herbal medication for hypertension?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Rasak
Cardiology 33 years experience
Not really: Most herbals are mild versions of the perscription treatment. Herbals are not regulated .Contrary to common beliefs herbals do have side effects and can interact with other meds.Make sure you tell your doctor if your on an herbal. I know it sounds better to most of us to be on an herbal rather than a perscription but would you eat mold for your strep throat or use penicillin?
Dr. Alan Cohen
Psychiatry 39 years experience
HBP: Ginkgo biloba (above)- enhances circulation and may lower pressure, garlic has long been used for this, as well as ginger. European mistletoe is also recommended, and buckwheat. There are more, including dandelion tea as a diuretic.
Dr. Alan Cohen
Psychiatry 39 years experience
Herbs for HBP: Garlic, ginger, ginkgo biloba, buckwheat. Dandelion is a diuretic, which will help. Rhemannia, chinese herb is also helpful. There are many others. Consult a good herbalist in the bay area. There's a plethora here. Chinatown in oakland or sf is a good place to start.

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A member asked:

Is it safe to use herbal skin remedies while nursing?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Pediatrics 27 years experience
No: I wouldn't. Many could be unsafe-- for example, products with lavender oil have estrogen-like effects, and have caused feminization of boys when used topically (though it's unclear if ingestion occurred.) i recommend you use plain, proven safe products-- anything that's labeled for use on your baby is going to be safe for you to use on your own skin.
A 44-year-old member asked:

Does pregnancy-induced hypertension cause hellp syndrome?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kevin O'neil
Urogynecology 28 years experience
No: Pih includes both gestational hypertension, which is a benign condition where the woman's blood pressure increases slightly without the associated proteinuria, edema or lab abnormalities found in pre-eclampsia. Hellp syndrome is a variant of severe pre-eclampsia characterized by hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low-platelets. Blood pressure may be high as well.
A 37-year-old member asked:

Can pregnancy-induced hypertension have a negative effects on my baby?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Yes: Depending on the severity it can lead to stunted growth, medically induced prematurity, etc.
A 36-year-old member asked:

Does pregnancy-induced hypertension cause premature deliveries?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Yes: Women with hypertensive complications of pregnancy have a higher chance of being delivered early because of problems their hypertension is causing them and/or their babies. Some hypertensive problems cannot be prevented, like preeclampsia. Chronic high blood pressure can be controlled or prevented by losing weight, reducing stress and daily exercise.
A 31-year-old member asked:

What herbal medicine is suggested to increase cd-4cells and decrease viral load for HIV patients?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Joel Gallant
Infectious Disease 36 years experience
None: There are no herbal medicines that have ever been shown to have these effects. People tried them all in the 80's and early 90's, before we had good HIV treatment. They didn't work, and many people died.

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Last updated Sep 28, 2016

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