A member asked:

Afghanistan war veteran saw extensive combat and lost his wife while deployed. recently said he thinks he's a sociopath? could it because of the loss

11 doctors weighed in across 6 answers
Dr. Heidi Fowler answered

Specializes in Psychiatry

I would not want to: try to guess at this. People sometimes have to do things in war that aren't congruent with their ethical norm. This can create great internal spiritual and emotional conflict and our views of our self & others can become very distorted. I would encourage your friend to get help through a VET Center, Veteran's Administration medical Center or military treatment facility (if still eligible).

Answered 8/2/2015

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Dr. Liesa Harte answered

Specializes in Family Medicine

Mental Health: He needs to work with a mental health professional. His loss is probably contributing to his issues, and his war experience would be contributing, as well. There is definitely hope.

Answered 7/3/2015

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Dr. Linda Callaghan answered

Specializes in Addiction Medicine

Could be.: He probably suffers from PTSD. I wonder why he thinks he is a sociopath ? He may benefit from therapy to deal with his Combat experience plus his loss of his wife. If any, he could learn the reason why he labeled himself with a personality disorder.

Answered 8/2/2015

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Dr. Erin Robertson answered

Specializes in General Practice

Self-diagnosing?: Did he self-diagnose or did a provider give him this? After all that he has suffered through, he could be in so much pain that he may be detaching, depersonalizing just to survive. That is not sociopathy by any means. True sociopaths are not capable of feeling loss or emotional pain. Please get him evaluated so he can get definitive treatment especially if he is still active duty for his safety.

Answered 8/2/2015

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Dr. Andrew Berry answered

Specializes in Clinical Psychology

NUMBING: Often combat veterans have an emotional defense that essentially puts their emotions in a deep freeze. They can seem cold and emotionless as a means of self protection to survive combat. Believe it or not, someone can come home from combat, lost a loved one, and literally have no emotion. This veteran needs to be evaluated by a psychiatrist for PTSD before sociopathy, AKA antisocial personality DO

Answered 8/2/2015

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Dr. Beverly Dexter answered

Specializes in Clinical Psychology

Combat veteran: Retired veteran, served in combat zone and numerous operational settings, I have worked with many combat vets. Experiencing such a severe loss while in a combat zone will affect people differently, but it does not make someone a sociopath. A true sociopath usually does not comment or care about their behavior nor experience remorse. In combat people under extreme stress may act out of character bu

Answered 8/2/2015

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