A 29-year-old female asked:
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is liver damage from alcohol linked to one's tolerance for alcohol? would someone get drunk quicker with a damaged liver? or the reverse?

1 doctor answer
Dr. Andrew Seibert
34 years experience Gastroenterology
It depends.: The liver uses an enzyme to metabolize alcohol. Initially, before liver disease begins, the liver can produce more of that enzyme with increasing alcohol consumption, allowing you to tolerate more alcohol. Once liver damage begins to occur, however, the liver is not able to make as much of that enzyme, and you may get drunk were quickly. If you have liver damage, you should drink no alcohol at all
Answered on Feb 23, 2020

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A member asked:
Dr. Elton Behner
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I am not aware of: a hair analysis for alcohol use. They can detect other substances however. Three months should not be a problem.
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