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A 31-year-old member asked:

Is a heart rate of 49 beats per minute healthy?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Saunders
Internal Medicine 44 years experience
Low pulse rate: Many very physically fit athletic people such as runners may have low testing heart rate in 40s and 50s however in older people and those not so fit may be a sign of heart disease or heart block or metabolic disease such as under active thyroid.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

Similar questions

A 45-year-old member asked:

My heart rate is 86 beats per minute. Is this normal?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Daniel Weiss
35 years experience
Likely yes: The normal resting heart rate is 60 -100, though it's typically in the 60's - 70's. 86 is a little high but may still be normal for you. If you have any symptoms (shortness fo breath with exertion, chest discomfort, dizziness) see you doctor.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 34-year-old member asked:

Heart rate 40 beats per minute, should I be concerned?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Venkata Chilakapati
Internal Medicine - Cardiology 24 years experience
Heart Rate 40: Yes. Your heart rate is low. Need to identify underlying etiology. Any a-v blocks or thyroid problems or CAD or medication induced. Consult your physician.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
ZA
A 35-year-old female asked:

Heart rate beats per minute 120 no other symptoms?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 34 years experience
Depends on details: Normal people don't have resting heart rates above 110. Details matter. A doctor can help diagnose it, if there is a problem. Helpful would be a diary of how and when any symptoms started, and what things make each symptom better or worse. Write down all medications, OTC drugs, street drugs, "herbal" supplements, etc... that might cause symptoms. Can call Dr. on video to ask about an office visit.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Lauren Bickel
Specializes in Family Medicine
Caffeine & decongestants & stress & dehydration all can contribute to increased heart rate as well
Apr 27, 2020
A 44-year-old member asked:

How many beats per minute is normal for athletes heart rate?

1 doctor answer7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Ajluni
Cardiology 36 years experience
Athletic heart: Typically a well-conditioned athlete's heart will run slower than normal because of well-conditioned autonomic reflexes as well as a larger stroke volume with each heart beat. It is NT uncommon to see resting heart rates in 40's-60's in such cases.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
United Kingdom (Great Britain)
A 28-year-old female asked:

My heart rate was 140 beats per minute. What is this? Is it dangerous?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Michael Dugan
Specializes in Hematology
A normal: Resting heart rate is under 100. This is high enough to suggest a stress, although just a high fever could result in this value.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

Related questions

A 31-year-old member asked:
I've got a resting heart rate of 30-40 beats per minute. Is that healthy?
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A 40-year-old member asked:
It's good and healthy to have a higher heart rate while exercising?
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A 20-year-old member asked:
Is a 76 resting heart rate healthy?
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Last updated Dec 25, 2018
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Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.