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A female asked:

can a dr or lab tell the difference between an oxycodone 15mg and oxycodone 30mg in a ua other then a higher dosage???

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
Neurology 33 years experience
Interesting question: I've never thought about that question when dealing with drug screens because to my knowledge they are strictly QUALITATIVE and not QUANTITATIVE. in other words, an employer only really cares if a substance is detectable or not. The police are more interested in HOW MUCH when it comes to Alcohol, weed, cocaine and so forth because the amount of jail time tends to go up with increasing quantities.
Dr. Leila Hashemi
Internal Medicine 21 years experience
Awesome answer like always Dr. Saghafi.
Aug 13, 2014
Dr. Romanth Waghmarae
Pain Management 39 years experience
UT Screen: If its only oxycodone - then the only way is to compare the actual levels in the urine screen. we expect higher levels with the higher dose. However there variables which have to be taken into account.
Dr. Andrea Rodgers
Emergency Medicine 28 years experience
Drug tests: A urine drug test can only detect the presence of the drug, it cannot determine the dosage. Why are you asking? Be honest with your doctor, he or she is on your side.

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Last updated Jun 23, 2017

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