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A 40-year-old member asked:

How to control mastocytosis?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brant Ward
Allergy and Immunology 15 years experience
Certain meds: Cutaneous masto can be treated with daily oral antihistamines or cromolyn applied to the skin, but sometimes may not need treatment. Systemic masto is usually treated with antihistamines, plus oral cromolyn for GI symptoms and epipen (epinephrine) for anaphylactic episodes. Aggressive forms may only respond to certain chemotherapy agents. See a specialist in masto for more information.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Brant Ward
Allergy and Immunology 15 years experience
Medications can help: Cutaneous (skin-only) mastocytosis can be treated with antihistamines, singulair, (montelukast) and topical cromolyn if the itching, etc., is problematic. The same meds can help systemic mastocytosis, with swallowed cromolyn for GI symptoms. Epinephrine can help resolve anaphylaxis if that occurs. Avoid codeine/opiates and other meds that directly activate mast cells. Talk with a specialist for more info.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

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Last updated Jul 9, 2015

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