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A 48-year-old member asked:

is there a link between any other disease and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Asaf Presente
Pulmonary Critical Care 16 years experience
Complications: While hht is a stand alone genetic disease - because it can affect a variety of organs there are several associated complications including iron deficiency anemia (from bleeding), pulmonary hypertension or high output cardiac failure - from avms. Rarely, hht is associated with juvenile polyposis (comes from mutation in 1 of the 3 genes known to cause hht) and requires additional care.

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A 34-year-old member asked:

How do people treat hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Stuart
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Investigate: Most people with hht just have dilated tiny blood vessels visible in their skin, but the abnormal blood vessels can occur anywhere in the body and you would want to have a doctor investigate, especially to make sure you don't have a vascular lesion or aneurism in the brain that could cause more serious trouble.
A 37-year-old member asked:

Drs, how do you detect hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Roman Bronfenbrener
Dermatology 9 years experience
History & Physical: Hht, or osler-weber-rendu syndrome, can be detected on physical examination with telangiectasia (red, lacy like, dilated blood vessels that blanch with pressure) over a patients oral mucosa (lips, cheeks, tongue) etc and on their skin. Patients may also have a history of recurrent nosebleeds and maybe even GI bleeding.
A 46-year-old member asked:

What is hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Roman Bronfenbrener
Dermatology 9 years experience
History & Physical: Hht, or osler-weber-rendu syndrome, can be detected on physical examination with telangiectasia (red, lacy like, dilated blood vessels that blanch with pressure) over a patients oral mucosa (lips, cheeks, tongue) etc and on their skin. Patients may also have a history of recurrent nosebleeds and maybe even GI bleeding.
A 42-year-old member asked:

What can be done about bleeds from hht, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Asaf Presente
Pulmonary Critical Care 16 years experience
Embolism: Bleeding from hht fall into two categories - minor ie. Small bleeds from telangectasia on mucosal surfaces like the nose/lips that can be inconvenient but usually stop easily, and potentially life threatening bleeds from avns in the lung, liver or brain. These avns should be screened for on a regular basis once hht has been diagnosed and may need embolization (sealed up from the inside) if found.
A 35-year-old member asked:

What do I need to know about living with hht (hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia).?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Asaf Presente
Pulmonary Critical Care 16 years experience
Complex Q: If a person has been diagnosed with hht they should see a doctor regularly who can direct their care and screen for complications. More information can be found at http://hht.Org/about-hht/.

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Last updated Feb 3, 2017
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