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A 40-year-old member asked:

How does non small cell carcinoma lung cancer get treated?

4 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology 51 years experience
Multiple ways: Non-small cell lung cancers are of two major varieties squamous cell and adeno carcinomas, along with a number of other less common types. Depending on the stage and type of tumor, surgery, radiation and chemotherapy are the usual options.
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Dr. Eric Toloza
Dr. Eric Toloza commented
Thoracic Surgery 32 years experience
Stage I and stage II non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are usually treated with surgery, while stage IV NSCLC is usually treated with chemotherapy. Stage III NSCLC is usually treated with a combination of 2 or 3 of these treatment options.
Apr 17, 2012
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology 51 years experience
Multiple ways: Non-small cell cancers are a heterogenous group, with the two common types being squamous cell and adeno carcinomas. These are usually treated, depending on the stage and type, with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Eric Toloza
Dr. Eric Toloza commented
Thoracic Surgery 32 years experience
Early stage (1 or 2) non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are usually treated surgically, although radiation therapy can be used if the patient is not a surgical candidate. Stage III is usually treated with a combination of 2 or 3 of the treatment opions. Stage IV is usually treated only with chemotherapy.
Apr 17, 2012
Dr. David Cooke
Thoracic Surgery 24 years experience
Depends on stage: Stage i and ii lung cancer is treated with surgery up front. If the lymph nodes have cancer, then the patient may need chemotherapy after (adjuvant) surgery. For stage iiia the treatment is either chemo and radiotherapy followed by surgery or chemoradiotherapy alone. Stage iiib and IV the treatment is chemotherapy +/- radiotherapy.
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Dr. Loki Skylizard
Thoracic Surgery 22 years experience
Multidisciplinary: Standard of care for stage i -iib nsclc is surgery. For stage iiia either chemotherapy +/- radiation followed by surgery or chemoradiation alone. Treatment is best by multidisciplinary and individualized with a targeted approach. The patient's overall health/fitness, tumor type, and molecular/genetic specifics should be considered to formulate best approach.
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Similar questions

A 38-year-old member asked:

How can non small cell carcinoma lung cancer get created?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Creighton Wright
surgery 58 years experience
A cell goes wild!: A cell is damaged by carcinogens, genetic failure and begins to multiply out of control and expands over time to a mass and then can spread very simple approach cancer is bad!
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Last updated Mar 10, 2018

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