A 36-year-old member asked:
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what are the causes of tooth de-mineralisation and are there alternatives to fillings?

2 doctor answers
Dr. Kevin Hanley
42 years experience Orthodontics
Bacterial attack: Demineralization is caused when acid produced by bacteria on the teeth eat away at the enamel crystal of the tooth. If allowed to continue, these areas will become cavities which will need fillings. If there is frank decay, the only treatment is with a filling material. When the areas are early in demineralization, fluoridated tooth pastes and mouthwashes can reverse this process.
Answered on Dec 29, 2013
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
35 years experience Dentistry
Demineraliaztion: Teeth are demineralized by acids. Bacteria on your teeth and gums will use the sugar you eat and produce acid. There is also a high acid content in soda, even diet soda, gatorade and other energy drinks. These acids will remove the minerals from teeth and cause cavities. Fluorides, mi paste, xylotol gum or mints can help to protect teeth from acids.
Answered on Dec 29, 2013

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