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Will a lymphangioma eventually grow smaller and go away on its own

A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Cornelia Franz
Specializes in Pediatrics
Not likely: The information i found indicates they tend to not be bothersome but does not indicate they involute and resolve on their own. The definitive treatmen ... Read More
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Dr. Troy Reyna
44 years experience Pediatric Surgery
No: Lymphangiomas are defects of the lymphatic system not to be confused with hemangiomas. Hemangiomas are known to involute as the child grows older afte ... Read More

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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Thomas Wright
29 years experience Phlebology
Not usually: Many infantile hemangioma go away but lymphangiomas usually require treatment sometimes surgical for resolution. It is important that the diagnosis an ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Myron Arlen
64 years experience Surgical Oncology
Sclerosing agents: Traditionally, surgical removal of lymphangioma has been the first treatment modality to be attempted. This approach has been on occasion, associate ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Trent Proffitt
24 years experience Vascular Surgery
Depends: Surgical resection or possible embolization or ablation using a scope if they can get to it. Using catheter-based intervention such as embolization i ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Sidman
40 years experience Pediatric ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Benign tumor: Lymphangioma is a collection of lymph vessels that carry blister fluid. No one knows why they form, or suddenly grow.
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Ebner
18 years experience Dermatology
It's possible. : They are not usually painful. However, depending on the location and if they are ulcerating or draining, they could potentially cause discomfort.
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeb Teichman
38 years experience Pediatrics
CT scan: Ct scan or possibly mri. Ultrasoind can be used as well but won't give you as accurate view of the anatomy involved.
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3 thanks
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kirk Charles
22 years experience Vascular Surgery
Pressure: buildup of pressure can lead to bulging of vessels and pain. Certainly any nerve involvement will lead to pain syndromes. See a specialist for treatme ... Read More
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A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
46 years experience Pediatrics
Sporadic problem: After reviewing the federal nih directory of rare disorders & other resources it is evident no new data has surfaced on this problem. Lymphangioma aka ... Read More
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A 27-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Bowers
33 years experience Internal Medicine
Hmmmm...: Do you mean cavernous hemangiomas?

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