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what is an apical infarct

A male asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
ECG: apical means the tip or apex of the left ventricle, inferoapical means the bottom wall and the tip of the left ventricle

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A female asked:
Dr. Alan Heldman
32 years experience Cardiology
Question? Consult!: These little boxes are not good for answering specific patient case problems. Consider a cardiology consultation here on HealthTap. The kind of con ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rick Koch
Dr. Rick Koch answered
21 years experience Cardiology
Generally not: As there is no ischemia on your stress unless symptoms suggest angina despite good medical therapy.
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1 comment
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Eric Lehr
Dr. Eric Lehr answered
23 years experience Thoracic Surgery
It varies: An apical infarction refers to the location of the heart attack, which is at the apex of the heart. The size can vary depending on how much of the he ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Anteroseptal: Anteroseptal myocardial infarction is usually caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. This cuts off blood flow to the ant ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Anteroseptal: Anteroseptal myocardial infarction is usually caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. This cuts off blood flow to the ant ... Read More
A 59-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Rasak
32 years experience Cardiology
I u mean inflamed?: I think you mean inflamed . This is called pericarditis. This is usually caused by infections or after a heart attack. Autoimmune diseases and gout ca ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Chapman
40 years experience Cardiology
Heart Attack: Infarction is a heart attack, anteroseptal describes the location, which is the front wall of the heart, and the wall between the ventricles. This ge ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Asaf Presente
15 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Many poss causes: An inferior mi refers to a heart attack on the inferior wall of the heart muscle. Almost all heart attacks are the result of fatty deposits on the in ... Read More
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1 thank
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Anteroseptal: Anteroseptal myocardial infarction is usually caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. This cuts off blood flow to the ant ... Read More
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1 thank
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Roth
39 years experience Hospital-based practice
A heart attack : The septum is the wall that separates the right from the left side of the heart. Myocardial infarction, a heart attack, is caused by a blocked artery ... Read More
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13 thanks
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Heart stroke: A heart stroke is also known as a myocardial infarction or heart attack. A blood clot forms in a heart blood vessel. This cuts off flow to a part of t ... Read More
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1 thank
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Frederick Tibayan
22 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Heart attack: Myocardial infarction mean death ("infarction") of heart muscle (card ~heart and myo~muscle). This happens when the heart muscle is not getting the ox ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Addagada Rao
55 years experience General Surgery
You mean episiotomy: An incision is made at vulva/vaginal fold during vaginal delivery to prevent tare or damage towards anorectal area ( may cause fecal or flatus inc ... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Isaacs
38 years experience Family Medicine
Inferior MI: Old (ie, completed and not acute) myocardial infarctions may be detected by ecg's. Some of the ECG (ekg) leads record electrical activity in the ... Read More
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2 comments
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A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Charles Jost
35 years experience Cardiology
Inferior WALL??: Could this be inferior wall ischemia? If so, this refers to the inferior wall of the heart, i.e. Location (bottom) of the ischemia. Ischemia indicat ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 57-year-old female asked:
Dr. Rick Koch
Dr. Rick Koch answered
21 years experience Cardiology
Lvh: Sounds like you had a nuclear stress with a small anterior perfusion defect )not uncommon especially in people with more breast tissue). Cardiologist ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alon Gitig
19 years experience Cardiology
Lack of enuff blood: "ischemia" = the normal tissue (eg heart, brain, intestine) is not receiving sufficient blood flow to supply the oxygen needed for the tissue's normal ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Akinesia: Lack of wall motion in systole of the part of the IV septum adjacent to the lv apex.
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Zimon
58 years experience Internal Medicine
Measures: the size and function of the chambers of the heart specifically heart muscle and the valves inside the heart Hope this is helpful! Dr Z
A female asked:
Dr. Donald Colantino
60 years experience Internal Medicine
Infarcts: Infarcts are areas of heart muscle damage or scars. They can be deemed to be acute or old depending on associated EKG patterns. Q waves are often patt ... Read More
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1 thank
A 57-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Rasak
32 years experience Cardiology
Two types of mi: One type is st segment elevation (formally called Q wave mi ) and a non st segment (formally called non q ) mi . The difference between the two is t ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Frontal Lobe: Infarction - is a previous stroke in the frontal lobe of the brain.
1
1 thank

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