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what causes low oxygen levels at night

A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Azmat Qayyum
32 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Same as adults: Any disease which can cause low oxygen saturation in adults will do in elderly. Pneumonia. Sepsis from any other infection heart failure bronchitis a ... Read More

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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Sparacino
36 years experience in Family Medicine
See below: Anything external or internal can can low oxygen level, but that has no relation to yawning.
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kristi Woods
22 years experience in Pediatrics
Many things: Infection, poor air flow into the lungs, poor blood flow to and from the lungs, a heart problem such as a hole within the heart could all cause this. ... Read More
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A 58-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ralph Boling
38 years experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Many issues,: anemia, heart or lung problems, infection, to name a few. An exam and testing with your doctor is the most logical way to answers.
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Matthew Majzun
13 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Depends on cause...: Most often, this is related to obstructive sleep apnea. This is when your airway becomes "floppy" while sleeping. The airway closes and no air can p ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Earle
30 years experience in General Surgery
Atelectasis: Sometimes, there can be parts of the lung not fully inflated called atelectasis. This could cause low oxygen levels and can be reversed by taking deep ... Read More
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A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Cesar Sturla
34 years experience in Internal Medicine
Below 95 %: Below 95 % in apparently healthy individuals.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Seema Khosla
21 years experience in Sleep Medicine
Have a sleep study: This may be due to obstructive sleep apnea. If you have documented low oxygen levels at night, see your doctor. You may also have a lung disease or ca ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hesham Hassaballa
21 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Above 90%: Normally, oxygen saturation should stay above 90% during sleep.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Park answered
49 years experience in Pediatrics
See below: I assume you are referring to "children with bpd." oxygen saturation below 90% while awake would require further evaluation and change in treatment m ... Read More
A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Liviu Klein
22 years experience in Cardiology
Normal : Low blood pressure during sleep and morning hours is normal. If you don't feel dizzy, no worries!
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hesham Hassaballa
21 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Many things...: Many things can cause a low oxygen level in the blood: so many, in fact, that i don't have enough room here to name them all. Here are some common ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
27 years experience in Pediatrics
Counter regulation : When blood sugar drops, adrenalin, cortisol, growth hormone, glucagon, and other hormones kick in to increase blood sugar from body stores. Particula ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
Many causes: Anemia, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, depression, low cardiac output, hypothyroid, inflammatory disease, cancer, etc... Really need more symptoms to be ab ... Read More
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Sneid
40 years experience in Endocrinology
How do: You know you have these hormonal changes? (i am assuming you mean aldosterone) they would be very unlikely to occur together in a human. If they did, ... Read More
A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Lynne Weixel
35 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Supply and demand: The exertion increases the demand for oxygen in many of your body's systems perhaps. Thus, unless the supply is also increased - there will be a (hope ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
SOB : Shortness of breath is a physical sensation of increased work of breathing, it can happen with normal po2, pulse goes up with exercise, it isn't unusu ... Read More
A 44-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience in Pathology
U R iron deficient: Probably. You'll start feeling tired before you become anemic as the iron that your cells need for metabolism are deficient. You need to find out why ... Read More
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A 69-year-old female asked:
Dr. Todd Woltman
29 years experience in General Surgery
Depends: 1 excess intake 2 hemochromatosis, a condition leading to accumulation of iron. Treated with medications and phlebotomy, or periodic removal of blood ... Read More
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A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience in Pathology
Get seen: Doing the arithmetic, it sounds as if you have a low absolute neutrophil count. If you are on any medications you don't need to be taking, including " ... Read More
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Low energy: Several possibilities, more common ones are the flu, depression, effect of medications, metabolic factors. Consult with your pcp for workup.
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tracy Berg
31 years experience in General Surgery
Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is potentially dangerous. The rate of fall and the cause of fall (excess Insulin after a heavy meal) are important fac ... Read More
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Susan Rhoads
37 years experience in Family Medicine
Low thyroid function: If you have a high TSH, it may be that you have hypothyroidism, which is very common & responds well to very cheap medication to correct. Low thy ... Read More
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