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ultrasound guided thoracentesis with chest tube placement

A 46-year-old female asked:
Dr. Silviu Pasniciuc
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Best: To answer will be the doc who will see him again as his clinical condition among others will be weighed in. The cause for his lung collapse, if found, ... Read More
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Dr. Amrita Dosanjh
35 years experience Pediatrics and Pediatric Pulmonology
Long flight: The area of the collapse, complications and his health will help to determine when he can fly. The flight is long and I would advise that he be fully ... Read More
1
1 thank

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A 29-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dominick Artuso
39 years experience General Surgery
Yes: There is usually mild discomfort in removing a chest tube. It is much less than pain felt during inserting the tube, which can be very painful.
2
2 thanks
Dr. Jon Krook
Dr. Jon Krook answered
23 years experience General Surgery
Not much: Much, much less then when it went in. There will be some discomfort, very little if any pain.
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ernest Block
34 years experience Trauma Surgery
That's Debatable: Some surgeons remove it at end expiration, reasoning no air can rush in then. Others remove it at maximum inspiration, since there will be no opportun ... Read More
6
6 thanks
Dr. Joseph Sucher
25 years experience Trauma Surgery
At end inspiration : The patient should fully inspire to the point he/she is unable to breath in any more. Therefore, there is little risk for sucking air into the chest c ... Read More
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tracy Berg
31 years experience General Surgery
Depends: Chest tube decompression of the thorax can be a minor operation in some clinical situations.
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Safford
34 years experience Critical Care
Pneumothorax: A chest tube is placed when the lung has collapsed. It allows the lung to re-expand. The chest tube is removed when there is no evidence of a "leak" ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Aaron Milstone
26 years experience Pulmonology
Depends: If this is an emergent need for a chest tube usually only local/topical medications are given. If this is an elective placement of the chest tube occ ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Chest drainage: It depends on the character of the effusion. Frequently malignant effusions will be bloody. Infectious effusions may be cloudy/pussy. Effusions from C ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience General Surgery
Depends: caused bybwhat? Trauma- bloody Cancer- bloody or yellow serous, or sero- sanguinous. Infection - bloody or cloudy or pus or serous
2
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Hahn
23 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Depends on cause: It really depends on the cause of the effusion. For example, it can look very bloody if related to a hemothorax or complicated parapneumonic effusion ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 62-year-old female asked:
Dr. Saptarshi Bandyopadhyay
20 years experience Hospital-based practice
Depends on condition: Removal is usually by the 1 who put it in. The chest tube is meant to re-inflate the lung, & shd e removed when conditions r "right" in the eyes o ... Read More
2
2 thanks

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