Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

trivial aortic regurgitation

A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Volkan Tuzcu
30 years experience Pediatric Cardiology
Aortic : No that should not cause any symptoms

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ira Friedlander
41 years experience Cardiac Electrophysiology
There is no good: way to predict the progression of your MVP. The fact that you also may have aortic valve involvement would suggest on clinical grounds that you might ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Martin Raff
55 years experience Infectious Disease
Might be: Depending upon the cause of the aortic regurgitation (and there are many), the presence of a bicuspid aortic valve, as an example, may be hereditary.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Martin Raff
55 years experience Infectious Disease
Generally yes.: This is usually a condition which will become worse over time.
2
2 thanks
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gerald Neuberg
37 years experience Cardiology
Slowly unless..: Depending on the cause, it may progress quite slowly unless there is further unjury to the valve from inflammation, infection, or uncontrolled hyperte ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mario Matos-Cruz
38 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Many: Acute valvular bacterial or fungal endocarditis, trauma, acute aortic dissection, sinus of valsalva aneurysm, acute deceleration compressive aortic va ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Weeks
44 years experience Family Medicine
Leaky valve: Aortic regurgitation describes blood flowing backwards through the aortic valve of the heart because the valve doesn't close completely. This can be d ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Long course: If the ar is acute (eg due to infection or trauma), the problem is urgent. Otherwise, there is a period of many decades in which it should be monitore ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Martin Raff
55 years experience Infectious Disease
Leakage: The aortic valve, when closed, prevents blood from rushing back into the left ventricle from which it has just been expelled by contraction of that ch ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ray Tidman
37 years experience Family Medicine
No: But , severe aortic regurgitation can lead to heart failure and inability to exercise.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month