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the difference between renal failure renal insufficiency and renal ischemia

A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Clarence Grim
56 years experience Endocrinology
Acute renal failure: Failure means kidneys stopped completely. Insufficiency not completely gone but not normal.

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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. W. james Chon
24 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Terminology: Many physicians including nephrologists will use the terms chronic renal failure, chronic renal insufficiency, and chronic kidney disease interchangea ... Read More
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1 thank
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shabbir Hossain
15 years experience Internal Medicine
Interchangeable term: They are all used interchangeably. They all suggest kidney disease (the reasons for which can be many).
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1 thank
A 46-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jason Kline
18 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Watch the salt. : Generally, dietary sodium restriction to < 2000mg daily helps control blood pressure which will help protect kidneys. Depending on the severity of kid ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rashed Hasan
30 years experience Pediatrics
Renal failure: Acute renal failure: seen in a healthy person who develops an illness (e.g. hemolytic uremic syndrome [in children] or septic shock and multiple organ ... Read More
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1 thank
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Silviu Pasniciuc
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Stages: Chronic kidney disease can be staged based on creatinine clearance in 5 stages. End stage usually designates stage 5 of chronic kidney disease.
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tambi Jarmi
22 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Not used: nephrologist don't use these term because they confuse patients. Kidney disease is classified based on stages from 1 to 6.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Fred McCurdy
44 years experience Pediatric Nephrology and Dialysis
Differences: Acute is something abrupt and may go away. ESRD is end-stage renal disease and will not go away. It will only get worse and requires significant inv ... Read More
A 43-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jason Cogdill
16 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Renal parenchymal dz: Renal parenchymal disease is a phrase usually listed in reports from imaging studies, it is an imaging finding. If you truly have an imaging abnormali ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Lin
Dr. James Lin answered
50 years experience Urology
Here are some...: Acute renal failure is a general term denoting kidneys not able to good enough to manage water and electrolytes due to acute conditions such as shocks ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kevin Griffiths
Specializes in Nephrology and Dialysis
Bone disease: People with renal failure develop weaken bones from abnormal mineralization of the bone. Renal osteodystrophy is the name of this process where calciu ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Cain
35 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Protein: necrosis refers to the death of cells, usually tubular kidney cells, also found though are vascular necrosis with vasculitis and glomerulonephrtis. N ... Read More
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1 thank
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Ajluni
34 years experience Cardiology
Renal failure: A buildup of acid occurs in renal failure as the kidneys are central in acid-base balance and regulation. Acid is a byproduct of metabolism and the i ... Read More
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gregg Nishi
21 years experience Bariatrics
Renal failure: Acute renal failure is a result of an injury, illness, or adverse drug reaction that injures your kidney (antibiotics, IV contrast, septic shock). Chr ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Clarence Grim
56 years experience Endocrinology
Renal failure: acute: normal a few days ago and not now. Chronic: been abnormal for some time.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alvin Lin
Dr. Alvin Lin answered
29 years experience Geriatrics
Same thing: No difference.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Fred McCurdy
44 years experience Pediatric Nephrology and Dialysis
Renal failure: Htn is a common abbreviation for hypertension (high blood pressure). Long-standing, untreated hypertension frequently results in damage to the kidney ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Cain
35 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Yes: Hypercalcemia causes resistance to ADH (vasopressin) (antidiuretic hormone), resulting in volume loss and potential renal failure.
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
CHF: Congestive heart failure occurs whenever the heart can't manage its job well enough for any reason. Coronary artery disease is just one of many, many ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. LUIS IRIZARRY
27 years experience Family Medicine
CAD CHF: CAD is narrowed arteries of the heart, may cause heart attack, which may cause heart to get weak & not pump well causing heart failure. In heart fail ... Read More
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Rasak
32 years experience Cardiology
Hypotn decreares fxn: Low blood presure to the kidneys causes the kidneys to malfuntion. The kidneys need a large blood volume with an adequate pressure to perfuse and fun ... Read More

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