Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

Stimulant

A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Lynne Weixel
35 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Drug?: Stimulants temporarily increase mental/physical functions. Most are addictive and can do damage to various organs if used long-term or in excess. Here ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Owen Scott
38 years experience in Clinical Psychology
They activate: physiological functions generally through various neurotransmitter systems. Common examples include caffeine, nicotine, pseudoephedrine, amphetamines ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Appetite stimulants: Some steroids. Talk with your doctor first.
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Evan Altman
18 years experience in Psychiatry
Mainly for ADHD: Stimulants are used mainly to treat adhd, improving inattention, impulsitivity, and hyperactivity symptoms. A common side effect is loss of appetite a ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 46-year-old male asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
Tolerance: There is potential for tolerance. A major issue is that Ritalin (methylphenidate) can be abused (with potential for addiction).
1
1 thank
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. R Sangal
Dr. R Sangal answered
42 years experience in Sleep Medicine
No: Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) is a mixture of amphetamines. Amphetamines increase availabiltiy of Dopamine and norepinephrine i ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kevin Passer
34 years experience in Child Psychiatry
I can try to guess: As often times, stimulants are used to treat the impulsivity associated with adhd, for a child who continued to display impulsivity while receiving st ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Koenigsberg
41 years experience in Psychiatry
No: Ritalin (methylphenidate) is methyphenidate, which is similar to the amphetamines, but a bit different chemically. Adieux is a central nervous system ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Chris Esguerra
15 years experience in Psychiatry
Similar pathways: The nonstimulant medications used to treat adhd in children include atomoxetine, guanfacine, and clonidine. Each of these target the areas in the bra ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 26-year-old male asked:
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin answered
35 years experience in Pain Management
It is addictive: Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) is a schedule II controlled substance, which means there is a high risk for addiction and/or abus ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Arthur Ciaramicoli
44 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Psychiatrists: The psychiatrists i refer to seldom prescribe these two medications together. Check with our doctor if you have concerns as to the possible counter in ... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Donald Alves
23 years experience in Emergency Medicine
Opposites: If you mean Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) in am/daytime and k-k at bedtime, then yes, ok. Otherwise, likely to see poor respons ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
48 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Not a good doctor...: A doctor can prescribe anything they want if they don't care about legal requirements, medical ethics and their own reputations, and if they lack a co ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) & Symmetrel: Not necessarily. Some patients with exhaustion or daytime sleepiness can benefit.
1
1 thank
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Glen Elliott
42 years experience in Child Psychiatry
Question unclear: What side effects, exactly, concern you about Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) that you think vasodialotors would counteract? At ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kerry Ragain
23 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Schedule appointment: The best thing to do here is to check in with your prescribing physician, and be as clear as possible with him or her about the progression or your sy ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bassam Amawi
48 years experience in Psychiatry
Adderrall is not : Used to treat bradycardia.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
Not normally: Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) is not an antidepressant. It is a stimulant medication that is used to treat add/adhd. It would n ... Read More
1
1 comment
A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. Donald Jacobson
39 years experience in Psychiatry
Miralax (polyethylene glycol): Miralax (polyethylene glycol) is over-the-counter and safe for long-term use for constipation. Make sure that the underlying cause of your constipatio ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Leonard Spishakoff
Specializes in Addiction Medicine
Yes: Like any substance that rewards the brain the potential for addiction in polygeneticallly and environmentally susceptible individuals will exist.
1
1 comment
1
1 thank
A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Clarence Lyons
19 years experience in Family Medicine
Both: Intuniv can be used with stimulant medications for adhd.
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Shah Chowdhury
41 years experience in Pediatrics
ADULT ADHD Rx:: Atomoxetine (strattera) is selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved by the fda for treatment of adhd in older than 6 years, adolescents ; ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Douglas Bey
56 years experience in Psychiatry
No: Need 2 evaluate why sleepy may b sleep apnea and solution CPAP also Nuvigil is a drug that sometimes helps.
1
1 thank
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Donald Jacobson
39 years experience in Psychiatry
Depends: It depends on the doses used and how your body metabolizes the drugs. One is not considered stronger than the other per se. The are both psychostimula ... Read More
A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jan Lei Iwata
25 years experience in Ophthalmology
They are different : Salts of magnesium. The magnesium citrate may be absorbed a little better, but if you take too much of either one, you might end up with loose stools. ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Prakash Bhoopalam
42 years experience in Pediatrics
Not usually: It is not a common side effect.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience in Gastroenterology
Minimize stimulants: Docusate (per pdr) helps moisten & soften hard, dry stools. It is not true laxative, but facilitates natural defecation, usually within 12 to 72 hours ... Read More
A 44-year-old female asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
No: It is a stimulant.
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Roth
42 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Mutual support helps: Consider attending a meeting of narcotics anonymous or Cocaine anonymous.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Singer
50 years experience in Pediatric Neurology
No: Bisacodyl laxatives work by increasing the fluid content of the stool to treat constipation. There should not be an interacton with adderall (dextroa ... Read More
A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Robert Killian
27 years experience in General Practice
Laxative Abuse: Nope. Absolutely not. This addiction is a common problem. The obsession is nearly debilitating in this addiction and one must get some control and he ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Glen Elliott
42 years experience in Child Psychiatry
Absolutely: Adderall (dextroamphetamine and racemic amphetamine) has been studied and used clinically for treating adhd since the late 1980's. For many years, it ... Read More
18
18 thanks
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Steven Reidbord
35 years experience in Psychiatry
As a side effect: Yes, amphetamines are bronchodilators, but aren't used for this purpose as there are safer and longer-lasting alternatives. If used for adhd, Adderall ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Sergio Schabelman
47 years experience in Cardiology
Avoid: Pvcs (if that is what they are) are more of a nuisance than dangerous in a healthy heart. Taurine and other supplements are not evaluated by fda and ... Read More
A 34-year-old male asked:
Dr. Julia Irwin
25 years experience in Psychiatry
Sometimes: Many of my add, adhd patients often react to stimulants with sedation or a calming effect.
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alan Cohen
38 years experience in Psychiatry
ADHD: There may be several reasons, most common is tolerance to the drug, hitting a therapeutic ceiling. That means you can't go higher on dose. Depends on ... Read More
5
5 thanks
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Stimulants: They are both stimulants of the Amphetamine group.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
48 years experience in Addiction Medicine
A handful of deaths: have been reported, but in none of the cases so far was it really a slam-dunk kind of proof. It has mostly been in younger people using higher doses ( ... Read More
A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. John Holmberg
21 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Anxiety can be : Similar to feeling over caffeinated, anxiety can increase with adhd stimulant meds. The increased focus can also make you more aware of all on your pl ... Read More
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Thomas Riney
36 years experience in Pediatrics
Stimulants: Have a much longer experience and a higher cure rate initially. Ritalin (methylphenidate) has been around for over 50 years and its side effects are w ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 7-year-old male asked:
Dr. Joseph Torkildson
38 years experience in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology
I think so!: Many people have an unnatural fear of fever, and are medicating children for very low grade fevers. I think fever medication should be reserved for ch ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Sparacino
36 years experience in Family Medicine
About 8 hours: About 8 hours.
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Johanna Fricke
49 years experience in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
No, it's not : It's probably the last thing you want to do, but if you get a thorough physical exam from your primary care doctor, (s)he can tell you what tanner sta ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience in Psychiatry
Anxiety & stimulants: The length of time stimulants "wear off" depends on which specific medications you're talking about. If you have anxiety, using any stimulants (inclu ... Read More
A 31-year-old male asked:
Dr. Brian Lynch
37 years experience in Family Medicine
Burn 24: I would discuss it with your physician who is giving you the zoloft (sertraline). I looked up "burn 24 " but i'm not sure that's the one you are taki ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Deborah Ungerleider
35 years experience in Pediatrics
Talk to your doctor.: If both of these medications are being prescribed for you, you should speak to the doctor who is prescribing them. Although there is no documented adv ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
That depends on: How serious it is and what drugs or medications were taken. Overdoses are often treated initially in an emergency room. The person is monitored and o ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 26-year-old male asked:
Dr. Nabil Moufarrej
43 years experience in Sleep Medicine
Tolerance: It varies by individual tolerance. Symptoms of nervousness, agitation, fast heart rate, nause may all indicate that you have exceeded your tolerance.
7
7 thanks

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month