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skin sore after binge eating

A 39-year-old female asked:
Dr. Robert Killian
27 years experience General Practice
You need a program: Hi i love this question. My first thought is that you are an ideal candidate for overeater's anonymous. Gathering with and participating in a fel ... Read More

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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vivek Huilgol
34 years experience Gastroenterology
Empty cabinet. : Change comes from within. In the meantime don't keep junk food around.
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Vikas Duvvuri
15 years experience Psychiatry
See below: Over time frequent intake of large amounts of fat and sugars (often associated with binges) will likely increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks an ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 22-year-old female asked:
Dr. Pierrette Mimi Poinsett
37 years experience Pediatrics
Disordered Eating: Binging and purging can cause all of the symptoms you are describing. Disordered eating is dangerous. The National Eating Disorders Association has ... Read More
A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. Cynthia Archer
18 years experience Internal Medicine
Where is it sore?: And how much alcohol? Which spicy food? How long ago between when you ate, drank and onset of symptoms? Were you having any vomiting or diarrhea earli ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 62-year-old female asked:
Dr. Robert Sterling
44 years experience Emergency Medicine
All Juiced-Up Again?: Now THAT sounds like something I"D like to drink (when I want to get out of work, that is...).You know, often we attribute the most notable things as ... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Tony Willson
16 years experience Family Medicine
Get seen: There is a bacteria you can get potentially from raw seafood. Discuss with a doc especially if your symptoms get worse.
A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Masoud Sadighpour
37 years experience Internal Medicine
Acne: It is a common belief that greasy food, or chocolate can cause acne. It is still very controversial if there is any food causing acne.
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1 thank
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Lois Freisleben-Cook
40 years experience Pediatrics
Overeaters anonymous: Is an organizaion that will help you explore what food means to you and why you abuse it. This is not something you can stop on your own or you would ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Frank Kuitems
38 years experience Internal Medicine
Well: Could be an allergy to chocolate stop eating chocolate and see an allergy doctor
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Anne Larson
33 years experience Hepatology
No: Foods should not cause a relapse. There is a very rare form of relapsing hepatitis a which can come back 1-2 times before it completely goes away.
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1 thank
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Katharine Cox
44 years experience Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Diet: Unless a stimulant should not affect your heart rate. Monitor the rate if you can and follow up for a HR greater than 100. All the best.
A 40-year-old female asked:
Dr. Salim Hayek
Specializes in Internal Medicine
Gastric acid reflux: Hello Carla, The most common cause of the symptoms you describe is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), commonly known as heart burn. Consider tr ... Read More
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1 thank
A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Kimberly Umhoefer
25 years experience Internal Medicine
Possible gerd: Your symptoms could be from acid reflux or gallbladder issues. Are you having any pain in your right upper quadrant of your abdomen? If so it is likel ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
If this is a pattern: Then you might have an allergy to chocolate or one of the ingredients in the chocolate food you are eating. Would recommend holding off on eating choc ... Read More
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr.
Dr. answered
Specializes in
Can be: You can sometimes get a post infectious sugar intolerance with these sorts of symptoms. See below: https://patient.info/health/lactose-intolerance- ... Read More
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1 thank
A member asked:
Dr. Chevies Newman
21 years experience Obstetrics and Gynecology
Absorption: The grease does not absorb and moves through the colon quickly, thats likely the issue, stay away from the greasy stuff for a while.
A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. Franklyn Gergits
28 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Burning throat: Greetings. The burning may be due to reflux. If you suffer from heartburn or GERD, then tums or a medication like Zantac (ranitidine) may be of help. ... Read More
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jovita Anyanwu
29 years experience Internal Medicine
Need more info: Vomiting before and after eating is abnormal. Pyschological and physical evaluation wil be neccessary.
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stevan Cordas
56 years experience Internal Medicine
Raw foods: Sometimes we see that. Are you allergic to anything on the new diet? If not, try it again in a week for just a few days and see if you can ease into i ... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jerome Litt
70 years experience Dermatology
EATING HURTS + RASH: EATING MEAT DOES NOT CAUSE PAIN. EATING MEAT DOES NOT CAUSE RASH. SEE YOUR REGULAR DOCTOR, OR, BETTER YET, SEE A DERMATOLOGIST FOR YOUR RASH . . .
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Richard Zimon
58 years experience Internal Medicine
At 8 months: many women have GERD like symptomatology due the the increased pressure on the stomach. However this does NOT mean no treatment is necessary. Ask you ... Read More
A 34-year-old male asked:
Dr. Randy Baker
39 years experience Holistic Medicine
Alcohol neuropathy: High amounts of alcohol are toxic; by binge drinking you are poisoning yourself- it can even be fatal. Usually this occurs in the arms and legs but ca ... Read More
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1 thank
A 45-year-old male asked:
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
Alcohol = toxin: The vomiting reflex is controlled by two units in the brain medulla--one receives nerve impulses from the GI tract, the other is a chemical receptor. ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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