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nuclear medicine bone scan radiation dose

A 21-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bruce Jacobs
Specializes in Family Medicine
It means you: are fine, bone scan shows nothing remarkable
Dr. Rick Pospisil
Specializes in Orthopedic Surgery
Bone scan: The fact that the interpreting md. stated it appears unremarkable is an indication that your scan is normal. The description about the distribution is ... Read More
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A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. TAPAN CHAUDHURI
55 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Very simple: 2 types of bone scans - (1) whole body bone scan (wbbs) & (2) three phase bone scan. In either case you get an injection of a radioactive material and ... Read More
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Dr. Robert Carroll
53 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Whole body or PET-CT: Bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals distribute in proportion to local bone metabolism. Phosphate compounds labelled with technetium 99m are most commonl ... Read More
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Dr. Guido Davidzon
18 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Tc-99m-MDP Bone Scan: Bone scan often provides an earlier diagnosis and demonstrates more lesions than are found by radiographic procedures.Tc-99m-mdp (methylene diphosphon ... Read More
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A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Levine
19 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Minimal: There is some radiation exposure as a bone scan involves injecting a radioactive isotope into your blood and then scaning your body to see where the r ... Read More
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Dr. Thomas Heston
29 years experience Family Medicine
Yes: The bone scan involves being administered a radiotracer that is then imaged by a camera. The amount of radiation is very small but not zero.
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Stuart Hickerson
32 years experience Family Medicine
Should not: The material used for bone scan is different than IV contrast for CT. I am unaware of anyone having a reaction for this reason.
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A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Gabor
33 years experience Diagnostic Radiology
CT vs bone scan: The amount of CT radiation exposure depends on the type of CT. Average effective radiation dose for bone scan is about 6 mSv. Dose for head CT is 2mS ... Read More
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gerald Mandell
52 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Sometimes same dose: Background radiation at sea level: 3 msv per year, denver residents get: 6 msv per year, cross country flight: 0.02 msv, x ray chest: 0.06 msv, ct he ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gerald Mandell
52 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Sometimes same dose: Background radiation at sea level: 3 msv per year, denver residents get: 6 msv per year, cross country flight: 0.02 msv, x ray chest: 0.06 msv, ct he ... Read More
A 71-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Carroll
53 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Not much.: A fraction of a ct scan dose.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gerald Mandell
52 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Yes: Both x-ray an isotope for bone scan produce ionizing irradiation. Exposure from isotope of bone scan in adult is about 6 msv. This is similar to some ... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kenneth Tepper
25 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Yes: To have a bone scan, a radioactive tracer is injected into the blood system. So yes, there is exposure to radiation.

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