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myasthenia gravis exercise program

A 16-year-old male asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
41 years experience Internal Medicine
Carefully: This question is not well studied - there is an ongoing investigation of the benefits of exercise in MG (see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles ... Read More

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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Dissin
39 years experience Neurology
Muscle fatigue: Mg is a disorder of neuromuscular transmission. As you continue to stimulate a nerve for muscular contraction, the degree of contraction gradually dim ... Read More
Dr. Jack Mutnick
17 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Myasthenia Gravis: Mg is a disorder characterized by weakness of skeletal muscles and rapid fatigue with exercise. Typically muscle weakness worsens throughout the day a ... Read More
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A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Thomas Josa
39 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Water: It depends on how severe the MG How about exercises in shallow water? Perhaps with a flotation device and supervision if necessary. If you have tro ... Read More
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A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bernard Seif
40 years experience Clinical Psychology
Strontium: is a mineral used to help bone health. It needs to be taken under the guidance of a doc or nutritionist. In Europe it is regulated as a drug. Stron ... Read More
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A 40-year-old female asked:
Dr. Stephen Southard
15 years experience Internal Medicine
Modulate your: Intensity. Regular, moderate exercise can combat atrophy that is sometimes seen with MG. Consider exercising in a way that stops short of muscle fat ... Read More
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A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Chiu
Dr. John Chiu answered
57 years experience Allergy and Immunology
No: Don't see any unusual risk from Forteo because of MG. It is important for you to get your osteoporosis treated since a major fracture will be devastat ... Read More
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A member asked:
Dr. Herbert Krob
29 years experience Neurology
The : The more common kind of myasthenia gravis is an acquired condition: your body is tricked into making antibodies that attack its own acetylcholine rece ... Read More
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A 24-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Dissin
39 years experience Neurology
Women>men: Before the age of 40 mg is 3x more common in women, but at older ages both sexes are equally affected. Familial cases are rare. Congenital mg in child ... Read More
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A 59-year-old male asked:
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin answered
36 years experience Pain Management
It is not possible: Myasthenia gravis can cause weakness in your neck, arms and legs, other muscles. MG is caused by antibodies blocking acetylcholine, but it is not cau ... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Julian Bragg
17 years experience Neurology
Fatigable weakness: The hallmark of myasthenia is "fatigable weakness", meaning that muscles get weaker with prolonged use. Typical symptoms include double vision, droop ... Read More
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