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mouth breathing sore throat

A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronda Alexander
18 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Dryness: Mouth-breathing most commonly results in dryness in the mouth and relative dehydration. It should not, however, give anyone a fever.
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Dr. Mark Loury
38 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Yes and no: Mouth breathing commonly causes a mild sore and dry throat that will improve with hydration. It by itself doesn't cause fever. A viral nasal infectio ... Read More

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A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barbara Stark Baxter
41 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Nose humidifies more: Your respiratory system is designed with a natural humidifying organ, your nose. When you do not breathe through it, the air bypasses its humidifier a ... Read More
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A 65-year-old female asked:
Dr. Warren Wolfe
57 years experience Family Medicine
Hopefully: She really may have caused a lot of chemical irritation. How much? that is the question that says she should be examined by her physician to see if an ... Read More
Dr. Robert Uyeda
44 years experience General Surgery
It should resolve: within a day or two. Try saline gargles and humidifier. I think it is just mild topical irritation. I am not aware of any substances in air freshe ... Read More
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Dr. Louise Andrew
45 years experience Emergency Medicine
Hard to say: ...you don't say how long it has been going on. You don't mention heart or lung disease. Usually, just inhaling what is mostly perfume wouldn't caus ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ron Jones
Dr. Ron Jones answered
44 years experience Family Medicine
Hair Cells: When air is filters though the nose there are hair cells and mucous cells which help to clean ands sort of humidify the air. This is usually worse in ... Read More
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
35 years experience Dentistry
Sore throat: See a doctor ASAP. Try gargling with warm salt water to break up the phlegm. It is important that you stay hydrated, so drink water or Gatorade.
A female asked:
Dr. Ayaz Samadani
56 years experience General Practice
Tonsillitis: You need to have checked for acute streptococcal infection or infectious mononucleosis
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bert Liang
Specializes in Neurology
See your doctor: If you have diagnosed sleep apnea, presumably you have had a sleep study ordered by a physician. Please follow up with that doctor who can outline tr ... Read More
A 17-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Fever?: You could have strep throat or mononucleosis. A simple throat swab and blood test will clarify.
A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. Amrita Dosanjh
35 years experience Pediatrics and Pediatric Pulmonology
Screen: Your symptoms are lingering and now include shortness of breath. This may be related to lower respiratory tract infection. Please see your physician f ... Read More
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A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. Amrita Dosanjh
35 years experience Pediatrics and Pediatric Pulmonology
Virtual appt HT: If you had contact with other individuals during the last two weeks, and did not self quarantine, please advise. There is also serum antibody testing ... Read More
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